Bali Raw: An expose of the underbelly of Bali, Indonesia (Extrait/Excerpt)

Romance on the Road: Traveling Women who Love Foreign Men
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Jeannette Belliveau – 2006 – ‎Snippet view
femme enough to attract toms, and not butch enough to attract dees) to be challenging hurdles.” One academic … In the Bali of the 1930s, many expatriate artists and visitors, including two women, found themselves roused by the comely and sensually refined locals (the island remains … One indication of how times have changed is this blatant proposition from a Javanese gigolo: “Want banana, Miss?
Bali: tourisme culturel et culture touristique – Page 89
https://books.google.com.ph › books – Translate this page

Michel Picard – 1992 – ‎Snippet view – ‎More editions
Par ailleurs, le développement de la station y a attiré une force de travail originaire d’autres régions de Bali ou d’autres îles de l’archipel. … manières occidentalisées et à l’accent australien, composés d’artistes ratés, de gigolos, de souteneurs, de trafiquants en tous genres, … recherchées pour leur argent autant que pour leur réputation de femmes faciles, et fréquente assidûment les endroits à la mode, …
Sex at the Margins: Migration, Labour Markets and the Rescue …
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Laura María Agustín – 2007 – ‎Preview – ‎More editions
Laura Agustín presents an analysis of the position prostitutes occupy within the global economy.
The Revival of Tradition in Indonesian Politics: The …
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Jamie Davidson, ‎David Henley – 2007 – ‎Preview – ‎More editions
This book investigates the revival of adat in Indonesian politics, identifying its origins, the historical factors that have conditioned it and the reasons behind its recent blossoming.
New York – Volume 32, Issue 4 – Page 82
https://books.google.com.ph › books

2000 – ‎Snippet view – ‎More editions
UA Astoria— 28-60 Steinway St. (7 1 8-726-1 279) Anna and the King; Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo; Galaxy Quest; Tlie Green Mile; Sleepy Hollow; Snow Falling on (Cedars. … 1 /20: Smiles of a Summer Night (1955); Les Bonnes Femmes (1960). …. Dance of the I ir- gins (1935) accompanied by a Balinese orchestra.
Halliwell’s Film, Video & DVD Guide
https://books.google.com.ph › books

2008 – ‎Snippet view – ‎More editions
… et une Femme: see A Man and a Woman Ho mm* i Femmes: Mode d’emploi: see Men Women; A User’s Manual ‘First she …. Elsa Lanchester, Kecnan Wynn Honeymoon in Bali US 1939 95m bw Paramount (Jeff Lazarus) GB title: Husbands or … A gigolo and a nurse team up to prey upon women looking for a husband.
The Loving Dominant
https://books.google.com.ph › books

John Warren – 2000 – ‎Snippet view – ‎More editions
John Warren, known as “Mentor” to the many who have read his books or hearkened to his sage advice at his workshops and gatherings, brought his decades of BDSM experience to his classic manual “The Loving Dominant”.
Who is who in Music: A Complete Presentation of the …
https://books.google.com.ph › books

1940 – ‎Snippet view – ‎More editions
… 657—Mr. Freddie Blues; 1862–Oh ! You Crazy Moon; 2613—On the Beach at Bali Bali ; 829—Outside of Paradise; 1568—Panic Is …. Bourbon, Ray, voc: Gigolo ; Chiropractor’s Wife; Lib. … 242—C’Est Pas La Peine; 23.1—C’Est Toujours La Meme Chanson: 327–Chez-Moi; 307—Comme Une Femme; 237—Coup Dur, …
Dirty French: Everyday Slang from
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Adrien Clautrier, ‎Henry Rowe – 2009 – ‎Preview – ‎More editions
This book includes phrases for every situation, including expressions for describing art that make one sound smart and cool.
Dynamiques identitaires en Asie et dans le Pacifique: Enjeux …
https://books.google.com.ph › books – Translate this page

Françoise Douaire-Marsaudon, ‎Bernard Sellato, ‎Chantal Zheng – 2006 – ‎Snippet view
Les femmes, certes encore très minoritaires, commencent à fréquenter certaines destinations pour chercher la compagnie de beach boys et autres gigolos bronzés. Ainsi les Japonaises et les Australiennes qui partent seules à Bali, les Israéliennes qui voyagent en groupe à Bangkok et les Japonaises qui se rendent à Phuket. Si les débats actuels autour de la prostitution au sein de l’Europe témoignent …

Girls Just Want To Have Fun

An interesting phenomenon, which was recently exposed in the fascinating film documentary ‘Cowboys in Paradise’, is the large number of Western and Japanese women who come to Bali seeking the attention of young men, both Western and Indonesian. Some of these women seem to have a bee in their bonnet about Western men living in Southeast Asia but they believe their own actions are beyond reproach.

I was once accused of paying Indonesian girls for sex by a forty-year-old Western woman who was sleeping with male Western tourists in their twenties. This accusation was levelled at me while we were sitting in a large group of people and for no other reason than because I lived in Bali. I was still in my no-payment phase but my accuser refused to accept this.

On another occasion, a forty-two year-old Australian divorcee boasted to me about her latest conquest: a nineteen-year-old Western boy. I didn’t judge her but I did make a note of the fact that she complained about Western men dating younger Indonesian girls.

On yet another occasion a Western woman, who booked a friend’s villa, rang all her friends and stated she would not stay in the house because the owner was sleeping with children. She claimed the victim was a child when in fact she was twenty-six, she was the owner’s long-time girlfriend and she had a five-year-old son from a previous relationship. Obviously the accusation hurt the man’s reputation and business.

I have met Western women who come to Bali for two weeks, pick up a different bloke every night, and then go home to their families to play wife and mum. This seems to happen on a rotational basis and the two-week girl’s holiday away from hubby and the kids is an organised triple-S tour: shop, spa and sex.

Female tourists also love young Indonesian boys. They pick them up, pay all their bills and buy them clothes, drinks and food. For some reason, a lot of these women see this as normal; they are just helping the poorer partner in the relationship keep up. That is until a man does the same thing. This they term as prostitution.

Surprisingly this is most prevalent among Japanese women, who seem to love Indonesian boys, and you often see a beautiful young Japanese girl traipsing around with her Indonesian boyfriend. As for the older Japanese women they are somewhat careful about these liaisons and they are generally carried out behind closed doors.

I was told once that this is a dominance thing. Japanese girls are given very little respect or power in their country, and creating a relationship with an Indonesian and controlling the finances allows them a level of power that they would not otherwise not receive. I was told this by one of the legendary Kuta cowboys, Bali’s beach gigolos. The guy told me this has gone as far as marrying two Western women and living in Australia with both, and he also has a child with a Japanese girl. He has since given up this lifestyle and wants to marry an Indonesian girl.

For Western women this happens more often than most people would believe, and although it has been going for a long time Western women are now becoming a little more blase in these endeavours. I have no problem with this, but it can be a case of glass houses, especially when I hear the problems Indonesian women have with Western women when they try and settle down with their Western men in a place like Australia.

The other thing about Western women that surprises me is that they attempt to pick up Indonesian working girls. Only recently, a friend’s Indonesian girlfriend told me that two Western women had tried to pick her up in a nightclub. This was not the first time I had heard of this and a lot of working girls have had similar experiences. Timi, a girl I know who works as a masseuse, tells me that Western women often ask for happy endings. Timi works in an upmarket, supposedly legitimate, spa; the place is exclusively for women and Timi worked hard to get the job so she did not have to give happy endings to men. I questioned Timi relentlessly about this and she swore it was true and it was happening in spas all over Bali.

Personally I couldn’t give a toss what female tourists get up to; I only mention it because male tourists get such a bad rap.

Montana’s Dimple Knees Sex Scandal: 1960s Prostitution, Payoffs and Politicians (Extrait/Excerpt)

When Bill returned a few days later, Bev said that she had planted a tape recorder, as suggested by the private detective she hired. The recording was distorted because she was yelling at her poodles during the conservation. Bev said she told the bagman that she still didn’t have $500 but would sell two ornate mirrors in the sitting room of her bordello, worth $1000 apiece. She had only one girl working upstairs due to pressure from Butte civic groups demanding an end to prostitution.

Bev provided a regular income to cops and Butte officials on the take, including Dimple Knees. It is unlikely they were responsible for the fires or the attempt to dynamite Bev’s other house four years earlier.

The insurance settlement from the fires allowed Bev to leave Butte, find a job as a waitress in another state and eventually get a college degree. ‘You know I’m a pretty good waitress,’ she said. Bev said she would take her poodles when she left Butte. ‘They don’t eat when I’m gone and they cry like babies.’

Bev’s relatives in Butte stayed in touch with her after she left town, including her sister, Fay, who said, ‘We had advised her never to return to Butte. They’d kill her.’ Fay, a cook at a Butte tavern, and her husband, Charles Smith Jr, said the cops harassed them after Bev left Butte. Charles said that prostitution would always be in Butte and should not be closed down.

Before leaving Butte, Bev said she turned over some of her records to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and fled in a pickup camper with her seven poodles. Later, Bev said she went to the Washington DC offices of Montana senators Mike Mansfield and Lee Metcalf to tell her story.

The Sexual History of London: From Roman Londinium to the Swinging City (Extrait/Excerpt)

The parks were also a major pick-up point, but the whores on parade were not the downtrodden ‘park women’ of Mayhew’s day. These prostitutes, dressed in their little black suits, walked their poodles along the Bayswater Pond and through Marble Arch, in search of prey. (Poodles had long been the dog of choice for prostitutes, a French tradition dating back to the late nineteenth century when top courtesans would ride through the Bois de Boulougne in their carriages, pet dogs proudly on display.) The blackout turned London into one massive Hyde Park, and made it impossible to police. In 1938 there had been over 3000 arrests for prostitution in the Metropolitan Police District, in 1939 there were only 1,865 and in 1940 1,505.

Cobbett’s Parliamentary History of England: From the Norman Conquest, in … (Google Books)

Prostitution and society: a survey – Page 201
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Fernando Henriques – 1961 – ‎Snippet view – ‎More editions
The public baths in the nineteenth century were notorious for all kinds of prostitution. <37) Russian female students of the period tended to dress as much like men as possible. Poodles were not always merely used as an advertisement — they …
The Sexual History of London: From Roman Londinium to the …
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Catharine Arnold – 2011 – ‎Preview – ‎More editions
Sir Leo Chiozza Money and a prostitute, Irene Savidge, were arrested on charges of indecent behaviour in Hyde Park in May … These prostitutes, dressed in their little black suits, walked their poodles along the Bayswater Road and through …
Their good names: twelve cases of libel and slander with … – Page 372
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Harford Montgomery Hyde – 1970 – ‎Snippet view
‘I hate poodles, and I also love poodles in the same way that I hate human beings and I also love human beings.’ Beyfus then read the … It is found in the company of prostitutes and used as an advertisement by prostitutes.’ He added that he …
Vivienne Westwood: an unfashionable life – Page 96
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Jane Mulvagh – 1998 – ‎Snippet view – ‎More editions
Their landlady was a prostitute. Jordan was working at SEX; Barker, her boyfriend at the time, was working as McLaren’s assistant; and Pavlovic earned £20 a night looking after prostitutes’ poodles while they went out on the game.
Attack poodles and other media mutants: the looting of the … – Page 102
https://books.google.com.ph › books

James Wolcott – 2004 – ‎Snippet view
The press corps aren’t prostitutes, they’re pushovers. … By January 1, 2004, Bush would have held only ten press conferences, compared to his father’s sixty-one and Clinton’s thirty-three during the same period in their 102 Attack Poodles.
News & Advertising in the Early Gold Camps of Nevada County, …
https://books.google.com.ph › books

2007 – ‎Snippet view – ‎More editions
That along side the residences of virtuous families, and in the most conspicuous places in our streets, Madam Bawd is to have her establishment of prostitutes, poodle dogs, and lecherous paramours? Are our children in passing to school, …

was become absolutely necessary. Perhaps this was the first instance, in which the people demanded an addition to their burthens. It was the chief object of the motion, to promote the relief and benefit of the poor. If carried into effect, it would lessen the poor-rates, render provisions more cheap and plentiful, diminish the instances of hydrophobia, and at the same time open a considerable source of revenue. The diminution of the consumption of flour, oatmeal, and those broken victuals which came from the tables of the affluent, and which at present, were consumed by dogs, would contribute greatly to alleviate the distresses of the poor. An increase of population was always the effect of plenty of provisions; and upon this principle, the application of that quantity of food which was at present consumed by dogs, to the use of the poor, would tend to augment the population of the country. The number

of dogs had lately increased so much, that it afforded matter of serious alarm. He calculated the population of the country

had not been able to find him. Another dog had been seen killing two sheep, which having done, he went and washed himself in a pond, so that there were no marks of blood upon him. The fact was told to his master, who agreed to han

him up for a few minutes by the .# legs, in order to put his guilt or innocence to the test, and from the quantity of blood which he vomited, he was declared guilty. He wished the chancellor of the exchequer to pay particular attention to these facts, as a certain dog had been found killing sheep in the neighbourhood of Holwood in Kent, with “The right hon. ” (he left the House to fill up the blank) upon the collar, and the dog was spared on account of his master.—Hydrophobia had lately increased to a shocking degree. In one week, in the course of last year, no fewer than $3 persons, infected with this distemper, had applied to the Manchester Infirmary. So far he called on the humanity of the House to adopt his motion, and he trusted they would be the more inclined to do it, when

to be ten millions, and these might com- he informed them that allowing a penny pose two millions of families. Allowing per day for the food of one million of a dog to each family, the number of dogs dogs, it amounted annually to 3,000,000l., would amount to two millions; but sup- which was 700,000l. more than all the posing them to be diminished one half in rates for the aged poor of the country, consequence of the tax, there would still and yet no dog, he thought, could be kept remain one million. Upon these he for less than a penny per day. By a letwould propose to levy a tax of 2s. 6d. a |ter from a gentleman at Kingston-uponhead, indiscriminately, except , those Thames, he learned that sheeps heads, which serve as guides to blind men. sheeps hearts and plucks, &c. were bought This would produce a revenue of 125,000l. up as offal to feed dogs, although the —Mr. Dent proceeded to state from do- poor were glad to purchase such provicuments in his possession, the ravages sions, and from his inquiries at twenty which were committed by dogs, the different markets, he learned that in Lonquantity of provisions consumed by them, don people did the same. . One gentleand the increase of hydrophobia. He man he had heard of, who contracted first mentioned a recent pamphlet by Dr. with his mealman to supply his kennel I}arry, upon the subject, which contained with wheat and flour, oats, and meal, at many unanswerable arguments in favour 800l. per annum. He himself knew a of the tax: next a number of letters, gentleman who expended 400l. per annum which he had received, to show that a on the same articles for his dogs. A

tax on dogs was desirable on account of their destruction of cattle ; and last their great consumption of provisions. From the Manchester, Philosophical Transac

pack of fox-hounds could not be kept for less than from 1,000l. to 2,000l. per year, and it was an absolute fact, that after a long chase, a gentleman rode into a

tions, it appeared, that 15.000 sheep were country town with his fox-hounds, claannually destroyed by dogs. He thought ‘mouring with hunger, and every baker’s this number much under-rated, and that . shop in the town was ransacked for bread it amounted nearer to 50,000. He had to satisfy them. Under all these circuma letter, informing him, that in a forest in stances, therefore, he hoped that the reDevonshire, one dog had wounded 400 solutions he meant to propose would not sheep, and his correspondent added, that be rejected. He then moved, “That a 200 men, with as many dogs, had gone tax of 2s. 6d. per annum be imposed on in search of this destructive animal, but | Dogs of every description.”

Mr. Pitt did not think there was any thing improper in laying some tax on dogs; but the committee would feel it necessary to draw a line of distinction. It was clear that the poor should not keep a great number of dogs; there were many indigent persons, nevertheless, to whom dogs were useful. Such persons ought to be distinguished from the opulent; otherwise the tax would be a harsh one. He should therefore propose, by way of amendment, that instead of a dut of 2s. 6d., there be a duty of 3s. on eac dog, meaning afterwards to propose in a committee on the bill, that all persons who do not pay assessed taxes, shall be charged only the duty of 1s. for each dog.

Mr. Burton thought the proposed tax a good one, but considering it rather a regulation of police than any thing else, he saw no reason why the dogs kept by the poor should be # to: from others. If a poor man kept a dog, and received relief from the parish, the parish supported his dog as well as himself.

Mr. Wilberforce thought the humanity

roposed to be extended to the poor was, in this case, misapplied. The true spirit of the tax was not to take from the purse of the poor, but to prevent those who were not perfectly able to bear the waste and .* from keeping dogs. He was persuaded, that, though the hydrophobia did not so often as was generally supposed, proceed from the bite of mad dogs, yet it was so often the case, that everything should be done that had a tendency to abridge the excessive number of those animals. By doing this, humanity would be best shown to the poor; for experience had proved, that the sufferings from canine madness were almost exclusively confined to the poor. The higher orders very seldom suffered in that way.

Mr. Lechmere had long thought that a measure of this sort was wanted. He trusted it would be of service to the public at large, and particularly to the poor at this time of scarcity. Gentlemen who kept a pack of fox hounds, ought to be compelled to pay high for them. He thought that all dogs used for pleasure should be subject to the tax; and that ladies lap-dogs should be taxed the highest. It was shameful to see an athletic fellow, in a gaudy livery with a couple of lap-dogs under his arms, walking after a lady through the Parks for a whole morning. , Sir G. P. Turner said, if ever a tax was

so this he believed would be so: and he felt great satisfaction that he had been among those who first suggested it. He mentioned several instances to show that dogs, multiplied as they now were, were a great nuisance. The amended motion was agreed to: and on the 15th, a bill pursuant thereto was brought in and read a first time.

April 25. Mr. Dent moved the order of the day for going into a committee on this Bill. The question being put, “. That the Speaker do now leave the chair,”

Mr. Sheridan said, he had never seen a bill so absurd and objectionable throughout; and indeed he was not sorry that it was so: it appeared to him a just punish: ment for the pride and presumption of those who, because they had a seat in that House, imagine themselves to be so many chancellors of the exchequer, and impatiently stepped forward to propose new taxes. He knew not whether the hon. mover was stimulated upon Pythagorean principles, to pursue at present those resentments or antipathies which he might have conceived in some former state of existence against a race of animals so long distinguished as the friends and favourites of men; he would undertake however to show, that the present bill was not admissible, in any of its provisions. In regard to the bill itself, he never met with one more extraordinarily worded. The folly of it extended even to the title; the title should have been a tax bill, it was nevertheless entitled “A bill for the better protection of the persons and property of his majesty’s subjects against the evilarising from theincreaseofdogs, by subjecting the keeping or having such dogs, to a duty.” Hence, instead of supposing, as it generally had been supposed, that dogs were better than watchmen for the protection of property, people might be led to imagine, that dogs were guilty of half the burglaries usually committed. . In the preamble there was the same singular species of phraseology: it began by stating that “Whereas great and serious dangers, injuries and inconveniencies,”—[He begged the House would admire the beauty of that climax]—“ and more especially the calamities of canine madness, of late alarmingly increasing, frequently happen

to the persons of his majesty’s subjects,

and to their cattle and other property.” It certainly was by no means extraordinary that a man’s cattle should be injured by the bite of a mad dog, but he could not conceive what was meant by other property, as he had never before heard that property could be affected with the hydrophobia. In The Adventurer, a periodical

aper by Dr. Hawkesworth, he remem|. indeed, a sort of humorous account of a dog that bit a hog in the streets; the hog bit a farmer, and the farmer bit a cow; and, what was most extraordinary, each conveyed his peculiar quality to the other; the hog barked like a dog, the farmer grunted like a hog, and the cow did the best she could to talk like the farmer. He should have imagined that there must have been something like this disposition in inanimate things also, by the hon. gentleman’s looking so very carefully after property ; for, unless an instance had occurred of furniture behaving in a disorderly manner, or a dumb waiter barking with the hydrophobia, he conceived such

a phrase could not be properly intro

duced.— The way in which the bill pro

osed to enforce its provisions was most inhuman. He particularly adverted to the clause in which it was proposed “That no person or persons shall be liable to any action, for killing, destroying, or converting to his own use, any dog for which the owner shall not have paid the duty.” If this clause were to remain, and any person did destroy or convert another person’s dog, he would most probably assume that it was not paid for. So far the bill was repugnant to the principles of humanity; for it was nothing less than a death-warrant against that valuable race of animals. Besides, he wanted to know what principle the bill proceeded upon, that the same privilege should not be also allowed with respect to horses, since there was a certain species of dogs, such as pointers, setters, &c. that were scarcely less valuable. According to the

same mode of reasoning too, he did not

see why there should not be a general scramble for all the hats upon the heads of those gentlemen who did not pay the hat duty ; nor why any person should not convert the powder, another man wore, to his own use, if he suspected that man had not taken out a licence. It was true, that after any person had lost his dog in this manner, a clause was provided, whereby he might bring an action, and maintain a right to recover damages from the converter; but how would it happen, if the dog, still fond of his former attach.

ments, should follow his old master 2 That master might, in such a case, be whipped as a dog stealer, though he should afterwards gain an action to prove the prosecutor the thief. The deprivation in this instance was not all: by the general slaughter which the tax would occasion, they were liable to convert into ferocity that mild and humane character which had hitherto been the just boast of Englishmen. Were the national manners likely to be improved by a system which tended to familiarise the rising generation to the spectacle of seeing those animals slaughtered or hanging at their doors, which they had been accustomed to consider as their friends and play-fellows? The charge of ingratitude would also lay against them for such a decree of massacre against these useful animals, at the very time when they acknowledged them as allies of the combined powers, and when their brethren formed a part of that combined army in Jamaica, which was fighting successfully against the Maroons, and supporting the cause of social order, humanity, and religion.— He came at last to the qualifying clause, which was intended to enact, that puppies, when born, should not be liable to the penalty. He wished to know at what time they were to be made liable, and by what parish register they were to ascertain the birth of pup: pies. A doctrine had been inculcated that dogs devoured the sustenance of the

oor; and therefore we were to be placed in the state of a besieged garrison, and feed upon the fare of dogs and cats. The bill in this instance tended to defeat its own object; for could it be supposed that the poor, at this moment of dearth and scarcity, could afford to divide their scanty meals with such animals? And if they did, what was the conclusion, but that they would rather deprive themselves of some of the necessaries of life, than lose their faithful companions. . If the tax were levied only upon hounds and spor

ting dogs, he should oppose it, because it

would tend to the diminution of the few pleasures which induced gentlemen to spend their fortunes on their own estates.

Mr. Windham said, he did not mean to object to the whole of the bill, but to part of it only. He thought a tax upon all sporting dogs fair, because they were a kind of luxury, and their owners could afford to pay. There appeared, however, a passion, a spleen, an enmity against the canine race in the formation of this bill,

[ocr errors]
that amounted really to a principle of extermination. From the tenor of it he should have been apt to imagine that Actaeon had revived, or that some fabulous divinities had descended to pronounce an eternal ban and curse on the whole race of dogs. They certainly at times were disagreeable, and he had felt that inconvenience; but he should have been loth to have avenged himself upon the whole species, in consequence of a little temporary inconvenience. It was unworthy of this or any country to levy a rate on any animal, because that animal was not employed in tilling ground, or because the poor might feed on dog’s provisions. The conclusion that naturally resulted from the general tenor of the bill, and the arguments that had been urged in support of it, warranted the idea, that there was not room enough on earth for men and dogs. The hon. mover had entered into various calculations, to show the number of dogs, and the quantity of provisions they consumed; but he seemed to have forgotten that there was a great body of waste which they destroyed, and which, if they were annihilated, would become a greater nuisance. He seemed to imagine, that all the refuse now given to dogs, would go to human creatures. No such thing ; dogs consumed a great quantity of offal, which could not well be

otherwise disposed of, and consequently

his calculation on the score of provisions consumed was exceedingly erroneous. He had also excited an alarm upon this head, by observing that population increased with provision. It undoubtedly did ; but not if there was a greater quantity of provisions than the consumers re. quired. How much of the produce of the earth went to other purposes than the food of man | Did not the hon. gentle

man himself give to his coach-horses and

his saddle-horses, what would serve for human food 2 But when the sustenance of men was considered, their comforts and

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]
winning attachment of a dog was remembered, it was unkind to propose any plan which should tend to destroy him. Dogs kept for sporting were peculiar to the rich; and though he did not mean to arraign sporting, he thought it not the highest sort of amusement, inasmuch as it reduced the hunter to the condition of the animal he hunted. With the rich it might be taxed ; but with the poor the affection for a dog was so natural, that in poetry and painting it had been constantly recorded, and in any sort of domestic representation, we scarcely see a picture without a memorial of this attachment. If the rich man feels a partiality for a dog, what must a poor man do, who has so few amusements? He would be des. titute without one. A dog was the companion of his laborious hours, and when he was bereft of his wife and children it filled up the dreary vacuity. It was a well-known fact that Alexander Selkirk, upon whose narrative the story of Robinson Crusoe was founded, sought the society of every animal upon the desart island, except those which he was obliged to kill for food. That was his greatest satisfaction; and a dog afforded a similar satisfaction to the poor. Would the House, then, sacrifice that honest, that virtuous satisfaction? An hon. gentleman had disapproved of any difference between the poor and rich, because he wished for equality, forgetting that equal burthens were laid upon unequal means,

and that they ought to be proportioned in the same manner as rewards and pumishments. But although he wished the tax to be levied upon sporting dogs, he was a friend to the game laws, and to aristocratical distinctions; and he thought all the arguments that had been urged against the game laws were recommendations in their favour, provided they were not oppressive. He did not think that poor men kept dogs for the destruction of game, and he lived in a game county where he was qualified to judge; besides, if a poacher wanted a dog for that purpose, he could afford to pay for it; so that extending the tax to the poor, would be no protection to the game. As to the worrying of sheep, the dogs commonly kept by poor people were too small ; for the dogs that worried sheep were pointers, hounds, lurchers, guard-dogs, &c. and whenever they were once guilty of that vice, they would never leave it off until they were destroyed; but, dead or alive, they haunted the animal, and had been known to tear the skins in tanners yards.He felt in perfect conformity with his hon. friend, when he did not wish to leave any assessment on the poor; for if people, so

or and distressed as some were who

ept dogs, would deprive themselves of art of their food to keep a dog, that was

the best proof of the value of the animal,

likely they would be to be taken up by the parish officers. An hon, friend had said, that no person who receives relief from the parish, ought to be allowed to keep a dog. He differed from him in opinion, because the whole class of labourers were so liable to apply for relief, on account of the unequal balance of their earnings and expenditure, that every ac

him to be so exceptionable, that he recommended it to be withdrawn. Mr. Dent was satisfied that by the conduct he had followed, he had done his duty. . It was said, that every man set up to be his own chancellor of the exchequer; and it appeared to him, that every man set up to be his own buffon. It was

said, that a dog was a harmless playfellow and he knew if they were assessed, how

to the children of the cottager, but he had received a letter which showed what kind of playfellow it was. The letter stated that a person who had seven chil

dren, with whom his dog had been used

to play, was bit by this dog, and also four of his children, in consequence of

which they had died of the hydrophobia.

cident or calamity subjected them to it.

It would be cruel and impolitic to pass such a law; it was a sort of law every man would revolt from. The dog was a

companion to a solitary man, and to a .

man with a family a playfellow for his children; and these considerations in

[blocks in formation]
general principle of the bill. The most

beggarly nation would not adopt a measure calculated to exterminate the canine race. Even in Turkey, where dogs were considered as unclean beasts, they were treated with some degree of kindness. In Some I. of Germany, dogs were taxed according to their size—a regulation which, if it were to take place in this kingdom, would subject him to a severe impost, as he once weighed one of his dogs against a nobleman in the other House, when the dog outweighed the peer by a pound. The hanging of dogs would familiarize the people to barbarity. The circumstance of a park-keeper once killing a favourite spaniel belonging to him when he was a boy, and cutting the animal’s head off afterwards with a hatchet, had made an impression on his mind that never would be erased. Had he had the hatchet in his hand, and had the park-keeper been in his power, at that time, he could not say what might have been the consequence. How, then, could the House say, that the poor man placed in a similar situation o: be actuated by similar feelings? The bill appeared to

At , Manchester 33 persons, within a twelvemonth, had been admitted into the infirmary, affected with this desperate malady; and at Southampton, 2 or 300 persons had been bit. Dogs consumed a great deal of the food which might be useful to alleviate the wants of the poor. Sheep’s heads could not be obtained by the poor, as they were all bought up for the use of dogs. He could never agree to anv distinction in the sums to be imposed upon the rich and the poor. Such inequality he considered as operating as a

land-tax. The object of the bill was re

gulation, not revenue, and to remedy the dreadful miseries arising from hydrophobia. The expense of a dog amounted to a penny a day, and upon his calculation of the number, more money was consumed on dogs, than the whole produce of the poor rates. Mr. Courtenay said, he had listened attentively to the new chancellor of the exchequer, who had just discovered that a dog cost a penny a day, whether he eat little or much, or whether he eat nothing. On what Fo the hon. gentleman had founded this extraordinary calculation, he could not imagine. The hon. gentleman had fixed his dentes canini on all who opposed his favourite bill: his dentes sapientiae were probably not yet grown. He had said, that every man was become his own buffoon; but if the hon. gentleman meant to assume that character, it must be in the other House, where he might be witty by proxy: perhaps he might prevail on his friend, the chancellor of the exchequer, to transfer him there. The hon. gentleman dreaded the direful effects of canine madness. To alleviate that horror, he begged leave to suggest the great utility which sometimes

The Twentieth Century Magazine, Volume 6

The Twentieth Century Magazine, Volume 6

A RELIGIOUS MENDICANT

“Wouldn’t it help you to keep off dogs?”

“Any housekeeper,” I replied, “if she is in a nervous condition, is afraid of the lightest walking stick. It looks like a club. To carry something to keep off dogs is like carrying a light ning rod to keep off lightning. I en counter a lot of barking and thunder, but have never been bitten or blasted.”

And while I was thus laboring for the respect of the Patriarch, the daugh ter-in-law stepped into the golden cir cle of the lantern-light. She had just come from the milking. I shall never forget those bashful, gleaming eyes, peering out from the sun bonnet’. Her sleeves were rolled to the shoulder. Startling indeed were those arms, as white as the foaming milk.

She set down the buckets with a big sigh of relaxation. She pushed back the sunbonnet to get a better look. Thfl old man addressed her in an authori tative and confident way, as though she were a mere adjunct of him, a part of his hospitality.

“Daughter, here is a good young man — he looks like a good young man, I think a stew-dent. You see he has books in his pocket. He wants a night’s lodg-ing. Now if he is a good young man, I think we can give him the bed in the spare room, and if he is a bad young man I think there is enough rope in the barn to hang him before daylight.”

“Yes, you can stay,” she said brightly. “Have you had supper?”

It is one of the rules of the road to tell the whole truth. But in this ease I lied. The woman was working too late.

“Oh, yes, I’ve had supper,” I said. And she carried the milk into the darkness.

In the city, having about the eco nomic status indicated by the big red barn and the enormous windmill and

the most substantial fence, this gleam ing woman would have languished in shelter. She would have played at many philanthropies, or gone to many study clubs, or had many lovers. She would have been conventional or adven turous according to her corner of the town. Here, her paramour was Work. He still caressed her, but would some day break her on the wheel.

The old man sent me toward the front porch alone. I remember the roll ing back of the low gray clouds just then, and t he coming of the moon. The moon’s moods are so mAny ! Tonight she took the forlornness out of the restless sky. She looked as domestic as the lantern.

You ought to be Ashamed of Yourself I was on the porch, scraping an ac quaintance with the Grandmother. She held a baby in her lap. They sat in the crossing of the moonlight and the lamplight. There was no one to explain me. I explained myself. She eyed me angrily. She did not want me to shake hands with the baby. She asked concerning her daughter-in-law :

“And did she say you could stay?”

“She did.”

The Grandmother brought a hard fist down on the arm of the chair. “I’d like to break her neck. She’s no more backbone than a rabbit.”

I do not distinctly remember any bitter old man I have met in my travels. She was the third bitter old woman. Probably with the same general expe riences as her husband, she had di gested them differently. She was on the shelf, but was made for efficiehey and had hot run down.

In youth her hair was probably red. Though she was plainly an old woman; it was now the brown of middle age. Under her roughness there were touches of a truly cultured accent and manner. I would have said that when

429

TWENTIETH CENTURY MAGAZINE

young she had had what they call “op portunities.”

I asked, “Isn’t the moon fine to night?”

She replied, “Why don’t you go to work?”

I answered, “I asked for work in the city till I was worn to a thread. And you are the first person who has urged it on me since I took to tramping. I wonder why no one ever thought of it before.”

She smiled grudgingly. “What kind of work did you try to do in the city?”

“I wanted to paint rainbows and gild sidewalks and blow bubbles for a liv- ing.”

“Don’t talk nonsense to me, young man.”

“Pardon me, leddy. I am a writer of rhymes.”

“The nation’s going to the dogs,” she said. I suppose I was the principal symptom of National Decay.

Just then a happy voice called through the house:

“Come to supper.”

“That’s for you,” said the Grand mother. “You ought tc be ashamed of yourself.”

Gretchen-Cerelia, Waitress. I went in the direction of the voice, de lighted, not ashamed. There, in that most cleanly kitchen stood the white- armed milkmaid, with cheeks of gera nium red. She had spread a table be fore me in the presence of mine enemy. I said:

“I did not ask for supper. I told you—.”

“Oh, I knew you were hungry. Wait on him, Grctchen-Cecelia.”

My hostess scurried into the other room. She was in a glorious mood over something with which I had nothing to do. Gretchen-Cecelia came out of the pantry and poured me a glass of warm milk. I looked at her, and my destiny

was sealed forevermore — or at least for an hour or so. The sight of her brought the tears to my eyes.

I know. You are saying, “Beware of the man with tears in his eyes.” Yes. I too have seen weeping exhibi tions. I remember a certain pious ex- horter — the collection followed soon. And I used to hear an actor brag about the way he wept when he looked upon a certain ladylike actress we all adore. He vividly pictured himself with a handkerchief to his devoted cheeks, waiting for his cue. He had belladonna eyes.

At the risk of being classed with such folk, I reaffirm that I was a little weepy. And I say it was not all gratitude for the sudden square meal. If the truth be told, I have had many such. It was the novel Gretchen-Cecelia.

It took little conversation to show that Gretchen-Cecelia was a privileged character. She had little of the touch of the farm upon her. She was the un spoiled pet of the household, and by her garments, the index of their taste and prosperity, what the novelists call the third generation.

She had a way of lifting her chin and shoving her fists deep into her apron pockets.

I said, “I have a fairy tale to read you after supper.” And she said, “I like fairy tales.” And then, redun dantly, “I like stories about fairies. Fairy stories are nice.”

It was no little pleasure to eat after nine hours doing without and to dwell on beauty such as this, after so many days’ absence from the museums of art and the curio shops. Every time she brought me more warm biscuits or re filled my tumbler, she brought me pretty thoughts as well.

She was nine years old, she told me. Her eyes were sometimes brown, some times violet. Her mouth was half a cherry and her chin was the quintes

430

A RELIGIOUS MENDICANT 35

sence of elegance. Her step was like the rain. Her braids were long and rich, her hair-ribbons wide and crisp.

Maidenhood has distinct stages. The sixteenth year, when unusually ripe, is a tender prophecy, almost fulfilled. Thirteen is often the climax of astrin gent childhood with its especial de fiance or charm. But nine years old is my favorite season. It is Spring in Winter. It is a fairy rendering of sweet sixteen through walls of impreg nable glass. This ripeness dates from prehistoric days when people lived in the tops of the trees and almost flew to and from the nests they built there, and mated much earlier than now.

As I finished eating, the mother brought little brother into the room, saying, “Gretchen-Cecelia, watch the baby.” Then she smiled on me and said, “And when she washes the dishes, you can hold him.” She had on a fresh gingham apron, blue, with white trimmings. I judged by the squeak that she had changed her shoes.

“Who’s coming?” I asked, when the mother had left.

“Papa. He goes around the state and digs oil-wells, and is back at the end of the week.”

Grandma came in. She frowned me away from the dishpan. She said, “Gretchen-Cecelia, wipe the dishes !” She herself washed them. Grctchcn put down the baby, and he howled on the floor. I was not to touch him. Gretchen tried to comfort him by say ing, “Baby, sweet, sweet baby, Baby sweet, sweet baby.”

“Do you realize, young man,” asked Grandma, “that I, an old woman, am washing your dishes for you?”

I was busy. I was putting my wet and holey stockinged feet on a board in the oven and my shoes were beginning to curl up on the back of the stove.

“Young man !”

“Yessum.”

“Where’s your wife?”

I replied, “I have no wife, and never did have.” Then I ventured to ask, “May I have the hand of Gretchen? I want someone who can wash dishes.”

“But I’m not grown up,” piped the maiden. It seemed her only objection.

I said, “I will wait and wait till you are seventeen.”

The Old Lady had no soul for trifles. She intoned, like a conscience that will not be slain :

“Where’s your rtrife?”

But I said in my heart, “Madam, you are only a suspender button on the necklace of the evening.”

Papa Has Come

There was a scurry and a flutter. Gretchen threw down her dish-towel, leaving Grandma a plate to wipe.

I heard the Grandmother say, “Wel come, son. Welcome, indeed.”

The young wife gave a smothered shriek and then in a minute I heard her exclaim, “John, you’re a scamp!”

I put on my hot shoes and went to see what this looked like. Gretchen- Cecelia was somewhere between them on her father’s shoulder, mussing his hair. And the mother took Gretchen down as John said, in reply to a ques tion :

“Business is good. Whether there’s oil or not, I dig the hole and get paid.”

The man, now standing at his full height, for his family to admire, was one I, too, could not help admiring. He had an open, sunburned face, and I thought that behind it there was a non- scheming mind that had attained to good fortune beyond the lot of most of the simple. He was worth the dressing- up the family had done for him, and almost worthy of Gretchen’s extra- crisp hair-ribbons.

His wife put her arms around his neck and whispered something,

431

TWENTIETH CENTURY MAGAZINE

evidently about me. He watched me over his shoulder as much as to say :

“And so it’s a stray dog wants shelter? No objections.” He un wrapped his package. It was an ex traordinary doll, with truly-truly hair, and Gretchen-Cecclia had to give him seven kisses and almost cry before he surrendered it.

24 TWENTIETH CENTURY MAGAZINE

Were girls told the dangers of extra marital sexual congress — how it ulti mately means either pregnancy or venereal disease — and could they know the meaning and consequences of these two conditions, from both physical and social standpoints, the ranks of the prostitutes would be much depleted.

Many a girl would not have made her sexual mistakes had she been advised. It is not because there was not time in the home or school to teach her a little practical sociology. No, there was time to teach her many other things of minor importance. In fact, it will al ways be found that these girls have zealously been taught many things that are not true, and that would be of little service to them if they were true. The reason the girl was not given this useful information is that for two thousand years the “pleasures of the flesh” have been regarded as evil. It has been droned out by sad-voiced prelates that “man is conceived in sin.” This wretched dogma has made its impres sion on the human heart ; mothers and fathers are loath to speak of these sinful things to the young; and their girls grow up ignorant, and go into prostitu tion for want of the saving information.

Another defect of education is that which exalts prudishness under the guise of modesty. The draping of the body, to hide its parts from view, had its ori gin in Christendom in the doctrine that “the flesh is evil.” Instead of hiding the body, this practice has directed atten tion to the covered parts. The vision of imagination has penetrated all draper ies, and carried with it the lascivious sense which the unobstructed eye would not. Sensuality has been promoted rather than suppressed. The exhibi tion of the naked human body is the be ginning of sexual morality. Unneces sarily to cover and screen it from vision is to insult it with shame which it does not deserve, proclaim it as evil, and di

rect attention to its more specialized sexual parts..

II. Of the causes which operate first upon the male factor, (1) the double standard of sexual morals is most im portant. It prompts men to employ the prostitute. They demand her as a masculine right. (2) Deferred marri age is another element. The causes of deferred marriage are largely economic, and rest upon the disproportion be tween wages and the cost of living. The wage-earning class is mulcted of most of the material wealth it produces. Men are paid neither their just wage nor enough to warrant assuming the re sponsibilities of marriage. The social system which bestows upon the non- producing class most of the wealth pro duced by labor is guilty of withholding from the man the bride to whom his in dustry entitles him. (3) The inability to regulate satisfactorily the number of offspring is also a potent factor. This, coupled with the superstition against copulation during pregnancy and lacta tion, drives married men out of the home to seek sexual gratification.

(4) The widespread belief among men in the need of sexual exercise as a preservative of health is a strong in fluence in the promotion of prostitution. The idea of the sexual necessity for men has been refuted by many students of these problems ; but those who want to believe in it continue in the majority. Still it is not difficult to show that more men have their health damaged by pros titutes than receive benefit from their administrations.

(5) Alcohol is the great promoter of sexual lust. Investigators who have questioned many men upon this subject have found that a large proportion of them made their first sexual mistakes while under the influence of alcohol. Young men are especially prone to se duction when intoxicated. Alcohol in hibits the action of the will, benumbs the

220

25

moral sense, and stimulates the sexual passions. No other poison plays so strong a role in the promotion of sex immorality.

(6) The absence of good feminine society in the circles of youth is a fac tor. Social contact with high-minded women satisfies the craving for feminine society and deters young men from seeking the society of the opposite type of women. A boy who has friendships among good women is apt to be ashamed to go among the lewd.

(7) The unlovable wife encourages prostitution. She may be sexually un attractive to the husband because of disease, pregnancy, fear of pregnancy, or coldness. The husband may be re sponsible for any or all of these causes ; but still he patronizes the other woman.

III. Of the factors that bear di rectly upon the female, the most im portant is (1) poverty. It is not only a primary cause of prostitution, but also a secondary cause, running into the other social conditions. In the United States are 6,000,000 women wage- workers, employed in the gainful indus tries. In New York City are 300,000 wage-earning women, living upon the brink of starvation. The wages which they earn scarcely provide them with the meager necessities of life; of the joys of life they have but little. Many of them cannot live upon their wages and must supplement them from other sources ; many have others depending upon them.

Studies of the problem show that wages are regulated by the cost of sub sistence. Workers are paid as little as they can exist upon and still be fairly efficient, capital demanding that the pay shall be so near the starvation limit that the workers shall live in fear of want. The interests of capital also demand that there shall at all times be an un employed class seeking employment.

Most of the money in this great coun try which is bequeathed by the wealthy to care for damaged human beings has been wrung from those very same hu man beings who were sacrificed for its production. The curse of capitalistic greed is a basic factor in the social evils, and they will exist so long as the right to exploit human beings is tol erated by society.

August Bebel illustrates the relation of prostitution to wages by the report of the Chief Constable of Bolton, Eng land, showing that the number of young prostitutes increased more during the English cotton famine, consequent upon the Civil War in America, than during the previous twenty-five years. Read the pitiful records of the women who were driven by destitution to sell them selves as reported in Sanger’s “History of Prostitution.” Of 2000 prostitutes investigated in New York, 525 gave des titution as the cause of their going into that life. This is the largest number under any one cause. But poverty can be read into the others. “Drink,” “se duced and abandoned,” “ill-treatment by parents or husband,” “as an easy life,” “bad company,” “violated,” “se duced on emigrant ships,” “seduced in emigrant boarding-houses” — these cover most of the other causes, and all have poverty and bad economic condi tions at their base.

Whether it is because of lack of em ployment or because of the easier means of livelihood which prostitution offers, the earning of a living is the basic fac tor. A social condition which insured every woman and every man an oppor tunity to earn a decent living, and which segregated and provided for the few incompetents and moral derelicts, would have no prostitution. There might be women who would indulge in promiscuity or would be licentious, but they would not be prostitutes.

Rir-h women are not prostitutes, be

26

cause their livelihood is assured them. Prostitution is largely an economic problem. A woman who has been given the information which every woman should have, and who is not pathologic, does not barter her chastity for money except as a matter of economic expe diency.

Edmond Kelly says : “Chastity ought to be a purely moral or social question, not an economic one.” Quoting also from the same source a part of the re port of Miss Woodbridge, secretary of the Working Women’s Society: “It is a known fact that men’s wages cannot fall below a limit upon which they can exist, but women’s wages have no limit, since the paths of shame are always open to them. The very fact that some of these women receive partial support from brothers or fathers and are thus enabled to live upon less than they earn, forces other women who have no such support either to suffer for necessities or seek other means of support.”

Out of these conditions grow the low wages of shop girls and operatives. But even though not driven to it by pov erty, the girl who leaves the factory for prostitution cannot be blamed. Human automatons, fastened to whirling wheels, spending monotonous, soul- and life- destroying days of toil, crawling at night into their unlovely beds, crawling forth at break of day to toil again, dull and stolid, with hope half smothered — toiling slaves, who would begrudge them narcosis, death, or prostitution? The wonder is that there is not a greater de gree of public appreciation of the pros titute-making conditions, which society harbors because it foolishly thinks that it profits by them.

(2) Crozcded teiuvients intensify the women’s problem, for only the direst poverty would compel the acceptance of the low standard of living which they impose. They mean absence of true home life, unhygienic conditions,

squalor, and lack of privacy. One-thir teenth of the population of New York lives at a density of over 600 to the acre. There are one hundred and five blocks having a density of over 750 to the acre. If everybody lived under such conditions, all the people of the world could be accommodated in the state of Delaware. This is not for lack of land, for it would be possible to have in New York City over ten million people with a density of only 50 to the acre. Many apartments have from three to five oc cupants per room. In the Borough of Brooklyn, New York, there were in 1911, 127,000 dark rooms, and 50,000 wholly without windows or any other opening except a door. Poverty causes congestion, and congestion tends to loss of self-respect, to immorality, and to sexual irregularities. The records of our children’s societies show to how ap palling a degree the chastity of little girls is being sacrificed in the dark halls and crowded rooms of the tene ments.

(3) Child labor is one of the demor alizing products of our civilization. There are 2,000,000 children wage- earners in the United States. That means children who are denied adequate schooling and free play. They are forced into the mills and factories and tied up to machines. Their minds are dwarfed, their bodies stunted — all for “the hallowed privilege of working for a living.” Consult the findings of the U. S. Bureau of Labor, read Jchn Spargo’s “Bitter Cry of the Child,” peruse the reports of the National Con sumers’ League and of the National Child Labor Committee, and decide if we arc not creating prostitution out of the blood and flesh of children for the money there is in it. Any condition which makes for moral and physical de terioration makes ultimately for pros titution.

(4) The profits of vice promote the

222

27

traffic in women. Women must be got by fair means or foul in the interest of the business. Pimps, police, politicians, proprietors, cadets, madams, and white slavers — all demand girls. In Newark, Ohio, the people imposed a license of $1000 annually upon each saloon. Enough liquor could not be sold, by every effort, to satisfy the license fee — eighty saloons in a town of 25,000 in habitants, one saloon to every 65 adult men. Boys had to be made drunkards, gambling had to be added, for the peo ple wanted the $80,000 annually. The burden became so great that the saloons were forced to organize houses of pros titution to help raise the money. By combining these two splendid coopera tive business features the town affairs flourished.* The story is the same everywhere in America ; so long as there are profits to be made in prostitution, the great spirit of business enterprise will demand and secure the bodies and souls of women for exploitation for profits.

Raines Law hotels, excursion steam boats with rooms to rent, massage par lors, and landlords, all offer induce ments for the encouragement of prosti tution. The prostitute often pays for protection ; she pays extra rent to the landlord, fees to the janitor, and a sti pend to her protector; she induces men to drink, which gives a profit to the liquor trade ; she uses cabs and the tele phone much at night; and it is such business interests as these which often connive to share her profits.

(5) Lack of opportunity for the woman who has violated society’s con ventions helps recruit the ranks. A man and a woman together may violate the law of sexual conventionality, the man is received in society, the woman

*”The Thin Crust of Civilization,” by Ray Stannard Baker, in the American Magazine, April, 1911.

is cast out forever. Here are some of the reasons given by women for entering prostitution: “My lover betrayed me, and I could not go back home.” The lover (sic), of course, could go back home. “My father refused to let me stay in the house when he learned that I had been raped, for that was what it was.” The father continued to regard himself as good enough to stay in the house. “My brother told on me to my father and he turned me out.” “Who is my brother?” reverberates down the ages. “My stepmother turned me out when she found that I was about to be come a mother.” This girl was a child of sixteen when thus cast out. These suffice. Society makes prostitutes by regarding such women as irretrievable sinners rather than as victims of its own sins.

(6) Social inequalities, which prompt girls to covet the fine raiment and jew els that other women display, is a fac tor of importance. This is noteworthy because of the fact that most of the dis play of this sort made by the rich is prompted not by an inherent love of the beautiful, but by the pleasure de rived from the consciousness of exciting envy in the minds of others who are less fortunate. So deeply fixed is this feel ing of pleasure in creating envy, on the one hand, and the desire for emulation of the rich, on the other, that the evi dences of conspicuous waste among the former class and of tawdry imitation among the latter class give to feminine raiment sundry characteristic and bizarre features. Many a poor girl covets these silly externals above all else. An image of man, in the guise of a lover, offers them to her; and she falls. She reads in the great metropoli tan press every day of the sensual in dulgences of women who have diamonds, automobiles, and lap dogs, and she feels that there is, perhaps, some connection

28 TWENTIETH CENTURY MAGAZINE

between the practices and the posses sions of these people. The influence of the newspaper notoriety of sexually loose women is confirmed by the stage and the novel, which present to impres sionable girls, women of this character in the light of heroines.

(7) The absence of good, wholesome, family life, especially in cities, causes prostitution. The majority of girls in the great American cities have no home life worthy of the name. At night they seek the streets, and find there, in the dance-halls, and in the cheap shows, the pleasures which the home fails to sup ply. In New York are three hundred dance-halls. The decent ones are so few as to be negligible. Nearly all are demoralizing to the girls who frequent them. Here the pimp, the spieler, and the cadet ply their trade. The condi tions are the same in all of our great cities. Of the first thousand girls sent from New York City to the Bedford, N. Y., Reformatory, the majority stated that they took their first down ward step in connection with the dance- halls. These institutions are allies of the liquor traffic, and business interests are served by them.

Mothercraft is a neglected science. Not enough of those who give birth to children, “mother” them. Girls are not growing up with the companionship of intelligent mothers. The blame is not the girls’. Girls cannot be expected to care for the companionship of empty- minded mothers.

(8) Seduction in young girlhood is a common result of defective education, deficient mothering, and the unlovely domestic and economic conditions inci dent to the slums.

(9) Unhappy childhood, due to un kind parents, intolerable restraints of the puritanic household, and uncon genial toil imposed upon the child, are factors of moment.

The most tragic phase of prostitu tion is to be found in those girls who are (10) driven into it by parents, guar dians, or husbands, as a matter of busi ness. There is a class of men living in idleness in our cities who are supported by the wages of the prostitutes whom they have created by seduction. Un der marriage, or the pretense of mar riage, these men ruin their victims, install them in houses of prostitution, and appropriate for themselves their bitterly earned wages. Girls are often lured from good homes by them; and many of the murders and suicides which entertain the patrons of the daily press are supplied from this form of enter prise.

(11) Servants seduced by the mas ter of the house or his sons swell the ranks of prostitution. The intimacies of domestic life make this one of the prolific causative factors. Girls in do mestic service fall easy victims also to other men, because they live in an en vironment in which the incompleteness of their own lives is daily manifested to them. Of the first thousand girls ad mitted to the Bedford Institution, 430 gave their occupation as general housework.

(12) The lack of social democracy, whether in the home or shop, often makes the position of the wage-earner intolerable. The humiliation to which the domestic servant is subjected in many homes renders prostitution at tractive to her. If every mistress would put on the servant’s garb and go through the servant’s life for just one day each year, a lesson in human sym pathy might be learned that would help to sweeten human intercourse. If the mistress could be made to realize that the servant is a human being who is possessed of the same longings as she and suffers from the lack of their grati fication just as she does, the domestic relations would be improved. Some

224

24 TWENTIETH CENTURY MAGAZINE

Were girls told the dangers of extra marital sexual congress — how it ulti mately means either pregnancy or venereal disease — and could they know the meaning and consequences of these two conditions, from both physical and social standpoints, the ranks of the prostitutes would be much depleted.

Many a girl would not have made her sexual mistakes had she been advised. It is not because there was not time in the home or school to teach her a little practical sociology. No, there was time to teach her many other things of minor importance. In fact, it will al ways be found that these girls have zealously been taught many things that are not true, and that would be of little service to them if they were true. The reason the girl was not given this useful information is that for two thousand years the “pleasures of the flesh” have been regarded as evil. It has been droned out by sad-voiced prelates that “man is conceived in sin.” This wretched dogma has made its impres sion on the human heart ; mothers and fathers are loath to speak of these sinful things to the young; and their girls grow up ignorant, and go into prostitu tion for want of the saving information.

Another defect of education is that which exalts prudishness under the guise of modesty. The draping of the body, to hide its parts from view, had its ori gin in Christendom in the doctrine that “the flesh is evil.” Instead of hiding the body, this practice has directed atten tion to the covered parts. The vision of imagination has penetrated all draper ies, and carried with it the lascivious sense which the unobstructed eye would not. Sensuality has been promoted rather than suppressed. The exhibi tion of the naked human body is the be ginning of sexual morality. Unneces sarily to cover and screen it from vision is to insult it with shame which it does not deserve, proclaim it as evil, and di

rect attention to its more specialized sexual parts..

II. Of the causes which operate first upon the male factor, (1) the double standard of sexual morals is most im portant. It prompts men to employ the prostitute. They demand her as a masculine right. (2) Deferred marri age is another element. The causes of deferred marriage are largely economic, and rest upon the disproportion be tween wages and the cost of living. The wage-earning class is mulcted of most of the material wealth it produces. Men are paid neither their just wage nor enough to warrant assuming the re sponsibilities of marriage. The social system which bestows upon the non- producing class most of the wealth pro duced by labor is guilty of withholding from the man the bride to whom his in dustry entitles him. (3) The inability to regulate satisfactorily the number of offspring is also a potent factor. This, coupled with the superstition against copulation during pregnancy and lacta tion, drives married men out of the home to seek sexual gratification.

(4) The widespread belief among men in the need of sexual exercise as a preservative of health is a strong in fluence in the promotion of prostitution. The idea of the sexual necessity for men has been refuted by many students of these problems ; but those who want to believe in it continue in the majority. Still it is not difficult to show that more men have their health damaged by pros titutes than receive benefit from their administrations.

(5) Alcohol is the great promoter of sexual lust. Investigators who have questioned many men upon this subject have found that a large proportion of them made their first sexual mistakes while under the influence of alcohol. Young men are especially prone to se duction when intoxicated. Alcohol in hibits the action of the will, benumbs the

220

25

moral sense, and stimulates the sexual passions. No other poison plays so strong a role in the promotion of sex immorality.

(6) The absence of good feminine society in the circles of youth is a fac tor. Social contact with high-minded women satisfies the craving for feminine society and deters young men from seeking the society of the opposite type of women. A boy who has friendships among good women is apt to be ashamed to go among the lewd.

(7) The unlovable wife encourages prostitution. She may be sexually un attractive to the husband because of disease, pregnancy, fear of pregnancy, or coldness. The husband may be re sponsible for any or all of these causes ; but still he patronizes the other woman.

III. Of the factors that bear di rectly upon the female, the most im portant is (1) poverty. It is not only a primary cause of prostitution, but also a secondary cause, running into the other social conditions. In the United States are 6,000,000 women wage- workers, employed in the gainful indus tries. In New York City are 300,000 wage-earning women, living upon the brink of starvation. The wages which they earn scarcely provide them with the meager necessities of life; of the joys of life they have but little. Many of them cannot live upon their wages and must supplement them from other sources ; many have others depending upon them.

Studies of the problem show that wages are regulated by the cost of sub sistence. Workers are paid as little as they can exist upon and still be fairly efficient, capital demanding that the pay shall be so near the starvation limit that the workers shall live in fear of want. The interests of capital also demand that there shall at all times be an un employed class seeking employment.

Most of the money in this great coun try which is bequeathed by the wealthy to care for damaged human beings has been wrung from those very same hu man beings who were sacrificed for its production. The curse of capitalistic greed is a basic factor in the social evils, and they will exist so long as the right to exploit human beings is tol erated by society.

August Bebel illustrates the relation of prostitution to wages by the report of the Chief Constable of Bolton, Eng land, showing that the number of young prostitutes increased more during the English cotton famine, consequent upon the Civil War in America, than during the previous twenty-five years. Read the pitiful records of the women who were driven by destitution to sell them selves as reported in Sanger’s “History of Prostitution.” Of 2000 prostitutes investigated in New York, 525 gave des titution as the cause of their going into that life. This is the largest number under any one cause. But poverty can be read into the others. “Drink,” “se duced and abandoned,” “ill-treatment by parents or husband,” “as an easy life,” “bad company,” “violated,” “se duced on emigrant ships,” “seduced in emigrant boarding-houses” — these cover most of the other causes, and all have poverty and bad economic condi tions at their base.

Whether it is because of lack of em ployment or because of the easier means of livelihood which prostitution offers, the earning of a living is the basic fac tor. A social condition which insured every woman and every man an oppor tunity to earn a decent living, and which segregated and provided for the few incompetents and moral derelicts, would have no prostitution. There might be women who would indulge in promiscuity or would be licentious, but they would not be prostitutes.

Rir-h women are not prostitutes, be

26

cause their livelihood is assured them. Prostitution is largely an economic problem. A woman who has been given the information which every woman should have, and who is not pathologic, does not barter her chastity for money except as a matter of economic expe diency.

Edmond Kelly says : “Chastity ought to be a purely moral or social question, not an economic one.” Quoting also from the same source a part of the re port of Miss Woodbridge, secretary of the Working Women’s Society: “It is a known fact that men’s wages cannot fall below a limit upon which they can exist, but women’s wages have no limit, since the paths of shame are always open to them. The very fact that some of these women receive partial support from brothers or fathers and are thus enabled to live upon less than they earn, forces other women who have no such support either to suffer for necessities or seek other means of support.”

Out of these conditions grow the low wages of shop girls and operatives. But even though not driven to it by pov erty, the girl who leaves the factory for prostitution cannot be blamed. Human automatons, fastened to whirling wheels, spending monotonous, soul- and life- destroying days of toil, crawling at night into their unlovely beds, crawling forth at break of day to toil again, dull and stolid, with hope half smothered — toiling slaves, who would begrudge them narcosis, death, or prostitution? The wonder is that there is not a greater de gree of public appreciation of the pros titute-making conditions, which society harbors because it foolishly thinks that it profits by them.

(2) Crozcded teiuvients intensify the women’s problem, for only the direst poverty would compel the acceptance of the low standard of living which they impose. They mean absence of true home life, unhygienic conditions,

squalor, and lack of privacy. One-thir teenth of the population of New York lives at a density of over 600 to the acre. There are one hundred and five blocks having a density of over 750 to the acre. If everybody lived under such conditions, all the people of the world could be accommodated in the state of Delaware. This is not for lack of land, for it would be possible to have in New York City over ten million people with a density of only 50 to the acre. Many apartments have from three to five oc cupants per room. In the Borough of Brooklyn, New York, there were in 1911, 127,000 dark rooms, and 50,000 wholly without windows or any other opening except a door. Poverty causes congestion, and congestion tends to loss of self-respect, to immorality, and to sexual irregularities. The records of our children’s societies show to how ap palling a degree the chastity of little girls is being sacrificed in the dark halls and crowded rooms of the tene ments.

(3) Child labor is one of the demor alizing products of our civilization. There are 2,000,000 children wage- earners in the United States. That means children who are denied adequate schooling and free play. They are forced into the mills and factories and tied up to machines. Their minds are dwarfed, their bodies stunted — all for “the hallowed privilege of working for a living.” Consult the findings of the U. S. Bureau of Labor, read Jchn Spargo’s “Bitter Cry of the Child,” peruse the reports of the National Con sumers’ League and of the National Child Labor Committee, and decide if we arc not creating prostitution out of the blood and flesh of children for the money there is in it. Any condition which makes for moral and physical de terioration makes ultimately for pros titution.

(4) The profits of vice promote the

222

27

traffic in women. Women must be got by fair means or foul in the interest of the business. Pimps, police, politicians, proprietors, cadets, madams, and white slavers — all demand girls. In Newark, Ohio, the people imposed a license of $1000 annually upon each saloon. Enough liquor could not be sold, by every effort, to satisfy the license fee — eighty saloons in a town of 25,000 in habitants, one saloon to every 65 adult men. Boys had to be made drunkards, gambling had to be added, for the peo ple wanted the $80,000 annually. The burden became so great that the saloons were forced to organize houses of pros titution to help raise the money. By combining these two splendid coopera tive business features the town affairs flourished.* The story is the same everywhere in America ; so long as there are profits to be made in prostitution, the great spirit of business enterprise will demand and secure the bodies and souls of women for exploitation for profits.

Raines Law hotels, excursion steam boats with rooms to rent, massage par lors, and landlords, all offer induce ments for the encouragement of prosti tution. The prostitute often pays for protection ; she pays extra rent to the landlord, fees to the janitor, and a sti pend to her protector; she induces men to drink, which gives a profit to the liquor trade ; she uses cabs and the tele phone much at night; and it is such business interests as these which often connive to share her profits.

(5) Lack of opportunity for the woman who has violated society’s con ventions helps recruit the ranks. A man and a woman together may violate the law of sexual conventionality, the man is received in society, the woman

*”The Thin Crust of Civilization,” by Ray Stannard Baker, in the American Magazine, April, 1911.

is cast out forever. Here are some of the reasons given by women for entering prostitution: “My lover betrayed me, and I could not go back home.” The lover (sic), of course, could go back home. “My father refused to let me stay in the house when he learned that I had been raped, for that was what it was.” The father continued to regard himself as good enough to stay in the house. “My brother told on me to my father and he turned me out.” “Who is my brother?” reverberates down the ages. “My stepmother turned me out when she found that I was about to be come a mother.” This girl was a child of sixteen when thus cast out. These suffice. Society makes prostitutes by regarding such women as irretrievable sinners rather than as victims of its own sins.

(6) Social inequalities, which prompt girls to covet the fine raiment and jew els that other women display, is a fac tor of importance. This is noteworthy because of the fact that most of the dis play of this sort made by the rich is prompted not by an inherent love of the beautiful, but by the pleasure de rived from the consciousness of exciting envy in the minds of others who are less fortunate. So deeply fixed is this feel ing of pleasure in creating envy, on the one hand, and the desire for emulation of the rich, on the other, that the evi dences of conspicuous waste among the former class and of tawdry imitation among the latter class give to feminine raiment sundry characteristic and bizarre features. Many a poor girl covets these silly externals above all else. An image of man, in the guise of a lover, offers them to her; and she falls. She reads in the great metropoli tan press every day of the sensual in dulgences of women who have diamonds, automobiles, and lap dogs, and she feels that there is, perhaps, some connection

28 TWENTIETH CENTURY MAGAZINE

between the practices and the posses sions of these people. The influence of the newspaper notoriety of sexually loose women is confirmed by the stage and the novel, which present to impres sionable girls, women of this character in the light of heroines.

(7) The absence of good, wholesome, family life, especially in cities, causes prostitution. The majority of girls in the great American cities have no home life worthy of the name. At night they seek the streets, and find there, in the dance-halls, and in the cheap shows, the pleasures which the home fails to sup ply. In New York are three hundred dance-halls. The decent ones are so few as to be negligible. Nearly all are demoralizing to the girls who frequent them. Here the pimp, the spieler, and the cadet ply their trade. The condi tions are the same in all of our great cities. Of the first thousand girls sent from New York City to the Bedford, N. Y., Reformatory, the majority stated that they took their first down ward step in connection with the dance- halls. These institutions are allies of the liquor traffic, and business interests are served by them.

Mothercraft is a neglected science. Not enough of those who give birth to children, “mother” them. Girls are not growing up with the companionship of intelligent mothers. The blame is not the girls’. Girls cannot be expected to care for the companionship of empty- minded mothers.

(8) Seduction in young girlhood is a common result of defective education, deficient mothering, and the unlovely domestic and economic conditions inci dent to the slums.

(9) Unhappy childhood, due to un kind parents, intolerable restraints of the puritanic household, and uncon genial toil imposed upon the child, are factors of moment.

The most tragic phase of prostitu tion is to be found in those girls who are (10) driven into it by parents, guar dians, or husbands, as a matter of busi ness. There is a class of men living in idleness in our cities who are supported by the wages of the prostitutes whom they have created by seduction. Un der marriage, or the pretense of mar riage, these men ruin their victims, install them in houses of prostitution, and appropriate for themselves their bitterly earned wages. Girls are often lured from good homes by them; and many of the murders and suicides which entertain the patrons of the daily press are supplied from this form of enter prise.

(11) Servants seduced by the mas ter of the house or his sons swell the ranks of prostitution. The intimacies of domestic life make this one of the prolific causative factors. Girls in do mestic service fall easy victims also to other men, because they live in an en vironment in which the incompleteness of their own lives is daily manifested to them. Of the first thousand girls ad mitted to the Bedford Institution, 430 gave their occupation as general housework.

(12) The lack of social democracy, whether in the home or shop, often makes the position of the wage-earner intolerable. The humiliation to which the domestic servant is subjected in many homes renders prostitution at tractive to her. If every mistress would put on the servant’s garb and go through the servant’s life for just one day each year, a lesson in human sym pathy might be learned that would help to sweeten human intercourse. If the mistress could be made to realize that the servant is a human being who is possessed of the same longings as she and suffers from the lack of their grati fication just as she does, the domestic relations would be improved. Some

224

THE CAUSES OF PROSTITUTION 29

times a servant retaliates for the slights, and evens up the social situa tion, by winning the master’s love. But the life lived by many a domestic ser vant justifies no blame if she prefers to venture upon prostitution.

(13) Alcohol is the seducer’s ally. A large proportion of the involuntary prostitutes are seduced by being first made drunk. This is the prevalent method in the saloon dance-halls. The dance music plays for a few minutes; the intervals between dances are much longer; the girls who do not drink are ordered out; a girl who has drudged in a sweatshop or factory all day must have some pleasure; and the home does not offer it. The social drinking also of alcohol among women and girls breaks down moral resistance. If the great slothful public could have driven home to it the relation of alcohol, not to poverty and crime, but just to sexual wrongs, it is inconceivable that it would not rise up and cast it out.

Education has been socialized, it is no longer a matter of private profit; but recreation, which comes next in im portance to education for the young, is still largely commercialized. We are just beginning to provide recreation fa cilities as a public duty; but the wider socialization of recreations is one of society’s most urgent needs.

As a number of causative factors have been mentioned which play a lesser role, and as many factors have been mentioned which are not wholly bad, this resume cannot be complete without a reference to (14) religion. The fact that all the great religions can be traced back to the worship of the creative and life-giving principles, as exemplified by the sun and the sexual organs, that prostitution was at one time a religious rite, and that at present the sexual emo tions play a strong role in the perpetu ation of these rites, renders it but natu ral that there should be a relation be

tween the two. Religious emotion and sexual emotion are closely related. Re ligious fervor is a manifestation of sex ual lust.

When we come down to the dominant religion of the western world we find that its literature, the Bible, contains recountals of nearly all types of sexual crimes, among which are the most re volting. This, from a historic or sci entific standpoint, is not objectionable; but the fact that the halo of sacredness is thrown about the men who committed these immoral acts, that they are held up as being “after God’s own heart,” that Christendom and Jewdom name their children after them, and that their pictures adorn the temples and the market-places, bears witness that they are approved of men.

It is to be regretted that so much of salaciousness, of degrading obscenity, and of brutal lust is embraced in a lit erature employed for purposes of moral teaching. The fact that men and women find excuses for their own laches in this literature is not to be wondered at. Sexual sinners often quote the Bible as though it were written specifically for their benefit.

The sexual excitement and immor alities engendered by such factors as the revival and camp-meeting are not to be overlooked. These primitive institu tions are passing into history, but among the less enlightened to whom they have been transmitted, they con tinue to be sexual orgies. The woman who in ecstasy exclaims, “Do whit you will with this poor vile body, but my soul belongs to Jesus,” possesses faith which represents a dangerous and im moral religious fervor. A long period of connection with a religious denomi national hospital has taught me that a pitifully large number of sexually ruined and venereally disabled young women are produced by the atmosphere

385

30 TWENTIETH CENTURY MAGAZINE

of the choirs of this church in the small towns of the East.*

(15) The police courts send women into prostitution by an unwise system of fines and penalties. A girl is brought in by a policeman, charged with va grancy, disorderly conduct, or some other indefinite offense (which often means simply having refused to be blackmailed), and the judge sentences her to pay a fine or go to the work house. How does this operation affect prostitution? If, being a prostitute, she pays the fine, she goes out on the street again with renewed zeal to get a man to recoup the loss which she has just paid into the treasury of the peo ple. If, being a prostitute, she goes to the workhouse, the brothel which is de prived of her services goes about it to replace the vacancy by another girl (here come in the pimp and the pro curer). If she is a young girl or a first .offender, she often is thrown into a cell with some criminal women who make her lose what self-respect she has left, and when she is returned to society it is with resentment, depravity, and the feeling that she has sunk too low ever to hope to rise again, and she proceeds upon the path toward which the finger of society points. t In New York 66 per cent of the women arrested when they come before the judge are so dis posed of that they may at once return to the street. A more humane treat ment of these unfortunates is beginning to be adopted in some cities ; but crimes against them will continue to be com mitted so long as the courts are the ante-chambers to penal methods. When the courts become chambers for scien tific diagnosis and judgment, for dis-

*See such works as “Sex Worship” by How ard, “Religion and I, ust,” by Weir, “Ancient Pagan and Modern Christian Symbolism” by Inman, etc.

fSee the case of Sophie Hirsch, N. Y. Call. -20 April, 1911.

covering the nature of the ill from which the girl is suffering, for deter mining the real cause of her illness, and for prescribing the treatment necessary for her care — in other words, for social justice, then we shall make progress.

The insane were once treated by throwing them in chains into a dun geon; the sick were once supposed to be bewitched and possessed of devils; criminals and prostitutes are still treated in conformity to the ancient su perstitions ; but a better day is to dawn when the light of science and humanity will be shed upon their misfortunes.

Besides economic and social causes of prostitution, there are causes which may be called pathologic. (16) Alco holism and syphilis in the parents, causing physical and moral deteriora tion in the offspring, are important. (17) IlI health should not be over looked. Often there is pelvic disease, producing abnormal libidinous im pulses ; or there may be central nervous disease; or glandular disease affecting the internal secretions ; or any other physical ailment making for instability. Some women have given as a reason physical inability to perform ordinary laborious work whereby to earn a live lihood.

Finally may be mentioned that pe culiar, ill-defined condition, called (18) degeneracy. In this class are the women of abnormal and defective mentality. Anyone who has talked much with pros titutes recognizes this as a not inconsid erable class. The shallow intellect, the perverted points of view, and the ab sence of sense of responsibility, charac terize many of these women. The prevalence of listeria is well known. At Bedford, among the first thousand admissions were 137 girls who were classified as “feeble-minded.” The sex ual perverts and the women of abnor mally lustful tendencies belong largely in this class. These are the women

THE CAUSES OF PROSTITUTION 31

who actually become prostitutes be cause they like it. But it should not be lost sight of that their mental and phy sical perversions can often be traced back to hereditary and educational wrongs, often born of bad economic conditions. Heredity is undoubtedly a strong factor; mental unbalance is transmitted.

In many cases this weakened moral and mental tone makes of the girl a vol untary prostitute. Neither poverty nor alcohol nor seduction plays any role. She is the seducer from the beginning. Moreover, this tendency toward pros titution, displayed by these girls who are mentally deficient, enters largely into combination with the other causes. Such a girl, under the influence of the excitement of alcohol or religion, or under the stress of poverty or the promise of fine raiment, loses her sexual self-respect forever; whereas a girl of better mind, under the same circum stances, retains hers. The latter woman has a better idea of what is right and expedient; she finds some way out with out the sacrifice of her chastity ; and when she does give herself up to sexual love (marriage unsanctioned by society), she still retains her self-respect and is not prone to drift on to prosti tution.

The women in whom the sexual urge is intense become prostitutes if men tally deficient ; if mentally strong they marry — conventionally or otherwise. If they do none of these things they must plunge into absorbing work, or they are destined to become intoxicated and destroyed by their own unelimi- nated products.

It is to the mentally or morally weak that the arguments of the female procurer appeal. This woman tells the girl of the easy way to make money, the easy life, good clothes, good friends, nnd good times. The simple girl falls, particularly if she have behind her any

of the other great causative factors to drive her on. Often the mental and moral weakness may be a matter of ig norance — defective education rather than heredity. These are the pathetic cases in which it is clear that the word of warning should have been a part of the girl’s education.

It should be borne in mind that pros titution is recruited from those who once were sexually clean. Many of these women once cherished hopes of love and the domestic joys. Prostitu tion was not their ambition. Men made it easy for them to fall; and, hav ing fallen, men and women made it dif ficult for them to rise. They are enHtled to the same consideration as are the victims of typhoid fever. Society is guilty in both cases. Prostitution and typhoid are products of vicious social conditions ; both are preventable.

Let us not with smugness deny this woman as our sister, for she is ; and we have wronged her. She has a better right to reproach us than we have to scorn her. Our guilt is greater than hers. There was a great fire in a fac tory in New York City. One hundred girls were burned to death or hurled themselves from windows to be crushed and mangled upon the structures below. The women who ply the trade of pros titution are as guiltless of their own destruction as were these poor girls. Their blood is upon society with its greed for money, its apathy, ignorance, indifference, active participation in crime, and its exploitation of the weak.

Let us cease to cry with self-assumed virtue, “Spare us from contamination by the prostitute who brazenly has come among us.” Let us be honest enough and decent enough to confess : “We are guilty ; we have made this woman what she is ; she is ours ; let us first be just to her; und then let us see to it that no more of our daughters walk in her footsteps.”

827

The Dilemmas of Laissez-Faire Population Policy in Capitalist Societies: When the Invisible Hand Controls Reproduction (Extrait)

Seurat – Page 124
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Richard Thomson – 1985 – ‎Snippet view – ‎More editions
… and hence were frequently associated with prostitutes — the suburban newspaper Autour de Paris explained in March 1887 that Parisian prostitutes visiting Asnières could be identified by their lap-dogs, with the pug as a particular favourite.

How does capital react in the face of perceived over- or underpopulation?
The United States has not witnessed underpopulation propaganda since President
Theodore Roosevelt59 galvanized “race suicide” plaints, accusing “the man or
woman who…has a brain so shallow and selfish as to dislike having children [of
being] in effect a criminal against the race….”60 Roosevelt, who later regretted “the
profound and lasting damage unwittingly done by Malthus,”61 castigated those who
wished to limit fertility so that the children could “‘taste a few of the good things
of life”’62 or “preferred automobiles and lap-dogs and put vapid excitement above
the performance of the highest duty….”63

The History of Prostitution: Its Extent, Causes, and Effects Throughout the … (Google Books)

A singular institution of Italian society is the Cicisbeo, or Cavaliere Servente. This is a distant male relative, or friend, who invariably attends a married lady on all occasions of her appearance in public. He pays her all conceivable attentions, and performs even the most servile offices; carries her fan, her parasol, or her lapdog. We are not aware that any foreigner has been able to settle this anomaly of social life to his satisfaction. The Italians themselves sometimes maintain that there is no immorality or impropriety in the arrangement—that it is a matter of etiquette, in which the heart is in no way concerned. The husband is perfectly cognizant of it, and the appearance of the cicisbeo with the lady is more de regle than that of her husband. Originally, there can be very little question that the institution was of an amorous character, and the parties met privately at the Casini, where certain apartments were specially dedicated to the use of the ladies and their cavalieri.” With the French occupation of 1800 the custom became the subject of immoderate raillery and satire, and there is reason to believe it has been but partially revived.

In place, however, of the cicisbeo or cavaliere servente, whose services and attentions were a form of society, it is, we fear, undeniable that more intimate though less avowed relations exist between many Italian ladies and other men than their husbands. That there are numerous and admirable exceptions to the rule, if it be a rule, we freely admit; but, unless the concurrent testimony of all writers and travelers in Italy be absolutely false, and either basely slanderous or culpably careless, the marriage vow can only be regarded as a cloak for a license that is inadmissible to the unmarried woman.

Balinese Gigolos (Google Books)

Search Results
Bali’s Kuta Cowboys: An Analytical Observation
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Marlinde Verhoeff – 2006 – ‎No preview
Women Travel: First-hand Accounts from More Than 60 Countries
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Natania Jansz, ‎Miranda Davies – 1999 – ‎Preview – ‎More editions
Indonesia The Kuta cowboys Denise Dowling Denise Dowling first encountered the “Kuta cowboys” during a college semester abroad, studying lndonesian language and culture at an American school in Bali. She returned six years later to …
Lonely Planet Bali & Lombok
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Lonely Planet, ‎Kate Morgan, ‎Ryan Ver Berkmoes – 2017 – ‎Preview
campur (rice with a choice of side dishes) are served in an open-fronted setting that harks back to when Kuta’s tourist hot … KUTA COWBOYS UNSADDLED You see them all around Bali’s southern beaches: young men who are buff, tattooed, …
Lonely Planet Bali, Lombok & Nusa Tenggara
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Lonely Planet – 2019 – ‎Preview
KUTA COWBOYS UNSADDLED You see them all around Bali’s southern beaches: young men who are buff, tattooed, long-haired and gregariously courtly. Long known as ‘Kuta cowboys’, they turn the Southeast Asian cliché of a younger …
Dirt, Undress, and Difference: Critical Perspectives on the … – Page 85
https://books.google.com.ph › books

American Anthropological Association. Meeting, ‎Adeline Marie Masquelier – 2005 – ‎Preview – ‎More editions
These beaches attract Balinese and Indonesian gigolos, known in the expatriate community as “Kuta Cowboys,” and the frequent marriages between … One teen enthused, “The great thing about Bali is that it looks just like a foreign country.
Cosmopolitanism and Tourism: Rethinking Theory and Practice
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Robert Shepherd – 2017 – ‎Preview – ‎More editions
There is an interesting parallel here with the infamous “Kuta cowboys” of Bali. In his 2009 documentary film Cowboys in Paradise, Amit Virmani documents the lives of young Balinese men from poor fishing families who “work the beaches” of …
Romance on the Road: Traveling Women who Love Foreign Men
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Jeannette Belliveau – 2006 – ‎Snippet view
The Kuta Cowboys The first gigolos I ever noticed in the course of my world travels were the Kuta Cowboys, lined along the wall at Peanuts Disco in southern Bali during my 1985 visit there. They had long hair, trendy sunglasses and affected …
The Incidence of Sexual Exploitation of Children in Tourism – Page 45
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Christine Beddoe, ‎Colin Michael Hall, ‎Chris Ryan – 2001 – ‎Snippet view
flows of refugees to Bali, adversely affecting the island’s tourist centres such as Denpasar and Badung physically, socially … (Denise Dowling:Kuta Sweats Sex http://www.balivillas.com/kutasex) For many people the image of the Kuta Cowboy – the …
Tourism and small entrepreneurs: development, national … – Page 137
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Heidi Dahles, ‎Karin Bras – 1999 – ‎Snippet view – ‎More editions
The lifestyle of the Kuta cowboys seems to have spread to other tourist areas in Indonesia. Commenting on the subculture of young males in Bali, an Australian journalist contrasted the life of a rice-cultivating peasant, a factory worker, and the …
Bali – Page 63
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Kate Daly, ‎James Lyon – 2003 – ‎Snippet view
Kuta Cowboys In tourist areas of Bali and Lombok, you’ll encounter young men who are keen to spend time with visiting women. Commonly called Kuta Cowboys, beach boys, bad boys, guides or gigolos, these guys think they’re super cool, …

Rough Guide to Bali & Lombok – Page 504
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Lesley Reader, ‎Lucy Ridout, ‎Rough Guides (Firm) – 2008 – ‎Snippet view – ‎More editions
… 306, 307 Kalibukbuk 304 Kamasan art 453 Kamasan, Bali 234 Kamasan, Lombok 363 Kapal 316 kayagan jagat 431 … Kuta (Lombok) 405 Kuta cowboys 64 Kuta Karnival 48, 100 Kuta, Bali 99, 103, 115, 119 Kuta, Bali 104 Kuta Karnival …
Elle – Volume 17, Issues 9-12 – Page 130
https://books.google.com.ph › books

2002 – ‎Snippet view – ‎More editions
Because the Indonesian rupiah is so weak, dinner in a good restaurant costs about $3 a person, but the average Bali- … flitting from one tourist to another, are called Bali boys, Casanovas, gigolos, and Kuta cowboys — the latter named for the …
Inside Indonesia: Bulletin of the Indonesia Resources and …
https://books.google.com.ph › books

1993 – ‎Snippet view – ‎More editions
Kuta. cowboy. A growing subculture of sex, drugs and alcohol is evident among male youth in the tourist areas of Bali and Lombok as they seek an alternative to poverty. Ask a first world tourist what tourism means to them, and they’ll probably …
Bali and Lombok – Page 99
https://books.google.com.ph › books

James Lyon, ‎Paul Greenway, ‎Tony Wheeler – 2001 – ‎Snippet view
Many animals can be infected, including dogs, cats, bats and monkeys, but there is currently no risk of rabies on Bali or … Kuta Cowboys In tourist areas of Bali, and to a lesser extent on Lombok, you’ll encounter young men who are keen to …
Bali: Cultural Tourism and Touristic Culture – Page 80
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Michel Picard – 1996 – ‎Snippet view
The master plan for Kuta, which in 1980 forecasted 7,000 rooms on 150 hectares by the year 2000, had become … the emergence of a type of young Indonesians called “Kuta cowboys”, with Western mannerisms and Australian accents, …
Collins illustrated guide to Bali – Page 92
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Suzanne Charlé – 1990 – ‎Snippet view
Everyone — tourists and Kuta residents alike — gravitates to the beach to watch the sunset. … After midnight, discos like Peanuts, primarily an Aussie hangout, the Spotlight, where Kuta cowboys ride a mechanical bull, the Sari Club and the …
Culture Contact and Social Change Through Tourism: … – Page 144
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Joseph S. Scures – 1994 – ‎Snippet view
And not to be outdone, the Balinese have their own burgeoning assortment of “Kuta Cowboys,” sometimes known as “Bali Boys,” whose prime target of present are young Japanese girls, who are seen as a virtual gold mine. F. The Kutanese …
Bali – Page 52
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Hunter, ‎Hunter Publishing, Incorporated – 1988 – ‎Snippet view
The Baliphiles. those visitors who stay to follow the odalan. sigh as they watch vendors parade towers of cheap sarongs … regret seeing so-called artists churn out tatty paintings by the dozen; and bewail the “Kuta cowboys”. boys who leave …
Bali – Page 52
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Elizabeth Reyes – 1987 – ‎Snippet view
The Baliphiles, those visitors who stay to follow the odalan, sigh as they watch vendors parade towers of cheap sarongs … and bewail the “Kuta cowboys”, boys who leave family to work in the low-budget losmen and hustle the foreign girls.
Sisters and Lovers: Women and Desire in Bali – Page 114
https://books.google.com.ph › books

Megan Jennaway – 2002 – ‎Snippet view – ‎More editions
Women and Desire in Bali Megan Jennaway. Photo 5.2. … Cowboys and Hippies in the Pleasure Economy Kuta Cowboys Another article in Inside Indonesia represented the Kuta cowboy as follows (Wolf 1993: 16; cf. McCarthy 1994: 19): In …

Visiting the Neighbours: Australians in Asia (Excerpt/Extrait)

Seekers
143
E at, Pray, Make Love | Of course, not all relationships were so utterly transactional. The famed sensuousness
of the Orient, along with the willingness to try new experiences
that can come with being away from home, gave rise to countless
holiday romances between Australians and Asians. Stories of love
blossoming across cultural divides became increasingly common as
tourism to Asia boomed from the 1970s. Reflecting a popular discomfort with the racial and gender dynamics of sex tourism rather
than a statistical reality, many of the better-known stories involve an
Australian woman falling in love with an Asian man.
As we have seen, Bali has long been associated with erotic sensuality and it is remarkably prominent in the real-life love stories
that have found a ready audience in recent years. The lush inland
town of Ubud had gained a special reputation for cross-cultural
romance even before the release of American writer Elizabeth Gilbert’s best-selling memoir Eat, Pray, Love and the 2010 film of the
same name. One of the princesses of the royal house of Ubud, Jero
Asri Kerthyasa, was born Jane Gillespie and grew up in Sydney
before meeting her future husband on holiday in 1977. The couple
had three children, all of whom now regularly commute between
Indonesia and Australia. Another member of the Ubud nobility,
Catherine Ellen Putri Westhoff, is also originally Australian, as is
Janet de Neefe, the well-known proprietor of the Casa Luna restaurant and founder of the Ubud Writers and Readers Festival. In
her memoir, Fragrant Rice, De Neefe recounts arriving in Bali in
1974 and being immediately enchanted by a ‘fragrant paradise …
saturated with sensuality and beauty’. She met her future husband,
Ketut Suardana, after the memory of ‘exotic flavours, fragrances
and pervading beauty’ drew her back to Bali some ten years later.
As a text, Fragrant Rice is unusually preoccupied with the sensory aspects of Balinese life, and its exotic flavours are particularly
prominent. De Neefe writes that Bali’s ‘seductive spices’ arouse a
‘passion for … this sensual cuisine’, which ‘runs hot through my
VisitingtheNeighboursText2Proof.indd 143 30/06/14 9:21 AM
Visiting the Neighbours
144
blood’. She carefully depicts sights, sounds and smells as well as
tastes in sensuous passages evoking ‘the haze and scent of steaming
rice and smoky coconut oil … piles of aromatic rhizomes, smelling of earth and eucalyptus, sun-bleached fragrant seeds, creamy
waxy nuts and dark shiny leaves’.78 As she recounts it, the sensual
attractions of Bali played an important role in her seduction, and
continue to fuel her passions.
Of course, not every woman who has fallen in love with an
Asian man has done so with a pure heart; neither was the love
always reciprocated. Travel narratives, especially romanticised ones
such as De Neefe’s, cannot be taken as representative of the reality
of Australian-Asian relationships. The lack of same-sex relationships in popular representations of cross-cultural romance, despite
a long history of homosexual contact between Australians and
Asians, is one glaring omission that speaks to a broader silence on
relationships that do not comfortably fit within mainstream societal
norms. In 2009, the documentary Cowboys in Paradise exposed the
female sex tourism that had long been part of the Balinese economy. Although couched in euphemisms, by which Balinese men
accepted ‘gifts’ in return for ‘romance’, it was evident that, apart
from the gender reversal, the situation in Bali was not entirely different from that in Pattaya or Bangkok.
While the documentary aroused a good deal of controversy in
Indonesia, female sex tourism was not a recent development. In the
1970s the Indonesia Do-It-Yourself guide openly reported that ‘hundreds of visiting Australian single girls live with Balinese boys’, and
it even advised other ‘wallflowers and the curious’ to head to Bali
so they could take advantage of this situation. Australian women as
well as men have travelled to Asia seeking the full gamut of sensory
experience. They were pilgrims and lovers; seekers of the carnal as
well as the spiritual. As Cowboys in Paradise put it, many had gone
to Asia looking to ‘Eat, Pray, Make Love’.79
Asia’s promise of deep spirituality and unbounded sensualVisitingtheNeighboursText2Proof.indd 144 30/06/14 9:21 AM
Seekers
145
ity has appealed to Australians for well over a century. The body
politics of conversion to an Asian religion or adoption of Eastern
spiritual practices can situate Australians as inferiors in knowledge
or wisdom and, at its extreme, has seen them take on the role of
novices learning at the feet of Asian masters. However, visitors most
often retained a critical perspective, and following the example set
by Alfred Deakin, selected the most appealing elements of Asian
spiritual traditions while leaving the rest behind. This selective
approach helped introduce a range of Asian aesthetics and cultural practices into Australian life from the 1960s. The fact that
Australians were eager to adopt Asian ways can appear significant
in light of a history of racism and imperial condescension. However, Westerners have been appropriating decorative Oriental arts
and traditions for centuries; indeed, the arrogation of Asian culture
has drawn criticism as an act of imperial power. This ambiguity
was reproduced by those who went to Asia looking to satisfy the
demands of the flesh, especially as sex became commercialised in
the wake of Vietnam War-era R & R. The Orientalist fantasy of submissive Asian butterflies became a reality through industrialised sex
tourism. The body politics of sex tourism are contentious, reflecting
longstanding Orientalist fantasies as well as gender inequalities,
economic disparities and wider geopolitical power dynamics. Yet
its inexorable spread also speaks to the continuing lure of Asia’s
sensual and sexual palette. This sensory attraction contributed to
the rise of mass tourism in subsequent decades, which forms the
subject of the following two chapters.

It’s all about power

If I’m not mistaken, it’s not just rich men who can have sex with younger or more international women especially if they’re prostitutes. So do some rich women really. Like if they don’t have power in their prior relationship, they can do it to a prostitute. (This is based on an article about Balinese gigolos and there’s ample evidence of white women marrying or having sex with Balinese men*.)

I think with these people, they do want to feel powerful and controlling that to them a prostitute’s viable because they can and willingly do what their clients want them to do. (Even if they don’t always like it themselves.) Again not always the case but I suspect with some controlling or patronising people, they want to control somebody or at least try to correct them.

(Even though it kind of makes their self esteem worse if they’re used to scolding or if their self-esteem’s bad, like with narcissists.)

But go easy on others. Yet there ares some controlling people who prefer to be with prostitutes because they seemingly comply with them a lot. Even if it’s kind of creepy in hindsight, that if they can’t leave others alone (especially if they’r independent enough to handle stuff) they find somebody else to exploit.

And just not a good look really.

*There are also reports of Chinese men marrying or having sex with Cameroonian, Ghanaian, Ugandan, Ukrainian and Russian women.