Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineer’s Monthly Journal, Volume 12 (Google Books)

OLD MAIDS. Tiage SlPat’°—n°—it has 1‘9$P°115ibi1iti°$”il” Old maids are Hymen’s failures. The
has a future!
____._?_
ANSWERING ‘A FOOL ACCORDING
TO HIS FOLLY.
Let me tell a Dutch story right here, be cause it came from a Dutchman in the eastern part of Pennsylvania, and must be a true story. The Dutchman was never ashamed of his religion. In his neighbor hood there was a skeptic who said: “You can’t believe anything you can’t under stand;” and so some of the better class asked the Dutchman if he would not have a
conversation with him. He said: “Yes, if
you tink best.” “ Have you any objections to some of the neighbors coming in ?”
“ N0, shust as you tink best.” S0 they made the a pointinent, and ev ery one was there. he old gentleman came in, laid down his hat. and was intro duced to the skeptic, and he suddenly be- P
“Veil, now look here. I
plee e Bible—what you pleefs? ’
Sagid l(i1e:rSt‘;lIddpn’t believe anything I
can un e – .
“Oh, you must be one very smart man. I vas mighty glad I meet you. I ask you some questions. The odder day I vas rid ing along the road and I meet von dog, and that dog he had von of his ears stand up in this vfiay andh the od3de6i;”von he stand down
so. ow w y.vas a
Now, that was very unhandy just then, very unhandy. He either had to prove that the dog did not have one ear standing up and the other standing down, or else he giil not believe it. So he said, “ I don’t ow. “Oh,1 than yliiu are notidso verytsmart after a l. as you ano er ques ion. saw in John Sr-iith’s clover patch, the clo ver come up so nice, and I looked over into the field and dere vas John Smith’s pigs; and dere come out hair on dere packs; and
in the very same clover patch vas his sheep, afiid dere! co|nedouIt’wool on dere packs. ow, w y vas at.’ Now, that was as bad as the other, be cause the same perplexity arose. He had to prove there was wool on the back of the ig, or hair on the back of the sheep, and e couldn’t tellbwhy, and tlFi‘e_refore he h_ad no‘ l.()1l(1)S3l26l::1guy. ”Bl.).6V9 it. inally he said,
“Vell,” he said, “you are not half so smart as you tink you are. Now, I asks
you anodder question. Do _you pleeve dere
is a God P’ “ No, I don’t believe any such nonsense.”
“ Oh, es, I hear about you long ago. I
know al about you. My Bible knows
about you, for in my Bible l.e says: ‘The fool says in his heart there is no God;’ but you, big fool, you blab it right out.” President G. 1′. Hayes.
gan b saying: f th
are so many pieces of raw material whic he has not succeeded in fashioning into
wives and mothers, and somethin of the shame of a lost life is attached to t em all.
Not that all of them deserve it. On the contrary, a great many of them have been the heroines of a great passion, not a few
of them have been the spoil of an evil chance, and some of them have lived for that which came not, and have withered into insignificance without once nearing,
except in dreams, the possession of the crown of woman’s life. A few there are who have fallen through ambition, and there are many who have missed their op
portunity through an excess of caution; but these we take to be in the minority. It is woman’s mission to win and be won, and those who do not succeed in achievin at least a part of this are better ofl.’ as t ey are than they would have been in other circumstances, inasmuch that they have roved that their capacity is not great, and that their place at man’s side is not desirable. The old maid is sometimes a ridiculous figure enough, but she is nearly always touching and compassionable. It is possible to laugh at her, and it is possible to
weep over her; she has in her the materials of a caricature, and she will serve as well for the text of a homily. Hers is a wasted
life, and there is something melancholy in her aspect, even though she be, as often times she is, as lively as a cricket, the provi dence of a score of nieces and nephews, the guiding spirit of a whole house old. For
she has been directed from her natural bent. She is, as it were, a blank sheet on which no words of comfort have ever been writ ten, and on which no man will ever write them, and between which and the waste
basket there is a mournfull obvious con nection. The woman who is born to be a
wife and a mother, and who fails to be
either, can hardly be said to have fulfilled her destiny, even though she should take all
the outcasts of humanity to her bosom; and although her ways may have fallen in pleasant places, and her days have gone
on without trouble or annoy, though the stream of her existence has flowed as
placidly and clearly as such “streams may flow, it is none the less certain that she would have enjoyed the world far more had one taken her by the hand for the long journey that ends in the churchyard, even though her road had lain altogether away from the green fields and quiet woods she traversed, and been set thick with thorns and stones and shards, and rough and bitter to an intolerable degree. For if she have
avoided great sorrows, she has missed great joys; and it is certain that neither are sor rows shared so keen as those unshared, nor are such joys as we savor selfishly and with out a companion to participate in them as
large and wholesome as those that arise
therefore,
154
i_i~ LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEERS’
from our intimacy with another. Life, in fact, is not a solo, but a duet; the song is
too much for a single voice, and if a single voice essay it we are conscious that we are
listening to something abnormal and that should not be. Sometimes the eflfect pro duced is comic, and we laugh and go our way. Sometimes, again, it is harsh and
disagreeable, spiteful and shrill, bitter and unendurable, and we stop our ears and shut our windows. Often it is pathetic and
beautiful, and we are rapt away in listen ing into an atmos%here of pity and admira tion and regret. ut it is never perfect.— London. __.{__
WORTH ON DRESSING.
An English paper gives the followin interesting particulars of Worth, the cele
brated dress-maker: Worth is a tallish man, with a big, clever head and very prominent forehead. His brown eyes are singularly shrewd in ex pression, and their seizure of detail is
surprising—that is, for a man. As a rule, men have no more eye for detail than owls have for the sun. Worth takes you in at a
glance, and knows what your style ought to be, which is such a comfort. When I go to a dress-maker, I don’t care to “work my pasage,” as Bob would say. I want to order a harmony in one or two colors, and to encounter brains equal to the occasion. Worth’s taste, when allowed full play, is irreproachable. “I prefer simplicity to everything else,” he says, “but there are women who don’t believe in the value of a
dress unless it is loaded with trimming. They drive me mad, for they won’t take
advice. Now, what is becoming to one
person is hideous when worn by another. study to make the best out of the subject given me, as, unfortunately, we can’t have people made to order, can we? If I had my way, all women should be slight, grace ful and pretty. Then dressing would be an artistic pleasure. A dress should never overpower the wearer. It should merely
be an appropriate frame for a charming picture, bringing out the beauties of the
picture, but never detracting from it. So few women understand this. Why, when I
find I can make a costume for less money than has been agreed upon, I actually
annoy my clients by telling them so. They think it cannot be as handsome as it ought to be, and they would rather have more material added, however much the design
may be marred, than pay less. I assure you this is a fact. Consequently, when I
meet ladies who know that dressing is an art, I take very great satisfaction in having
them as patrons. It isn’t every woman who knows how to wear a dress. When I
have done my best, I try to have my client do her best by seeing her walk and sit
down. To walk with style is rare enough, but when it comes to being able to sit
down in a dress properly—we1l, there are
not many equal to that, I can tell you. Then, women think they ought to have a
number of dresses, however hideous, rather than wear one dress, however becoming. There never was a greater mistake. f
our frame is appropriate, stick to it.
on’t be getting out of it and trying experiments. I have just made a dre for Mme. Nilsson, in which she looks better than I ever saw her before; and I have
begrged her to wear that dress constantly in ussia if she wants to produce a most
charming effect. As she is sensible, I think she will take my advice, which, you per ceive, is against my interest; but, good gracious me, money is not my only object. Art is intended to beautify nature, not to 8 deform it.”

Old maids are Hymen’s failures. They are so many pieces of raw material

are so many pieces of raw material whic he has not succeeded in fashioning into wives and mothers, and somethin of the shame of a lost life is attached to t em all. Not that all of them deserve it. On the contrary, a great many of them have been the heroines of a great passion, not a few of them have been the spoil of an evil chance, and some of them have lived for that which came not, and have withered into insignificance without once nearing, except in dreams, the possession of the crown of woman’s life. A few there are who have fallen through ambition, and there are many who have missed their opportunity through an excess of caution; but these we take to be in the minority. It is woman’s mission to win and be won, and those who do not succeed in achievin at least a part of this are better ofl.’ as t ey are than they would have been in other circumstances, inasmuch that they have roved that their capacity is not great, and that their place at man’s side is not desirable. The old maid is sometimes a ridiculous figure enough, but she is nearly always touching and compassionable. It is possible to laugh at her, and it is possible to weep over her; she has in her the materials of a caricature, and she will serve as well for the text of a homily. Hers is a wasted life, and there is something melancholy in her aspect, even though she be, as oftentimes she is, as lively as a cricket, the providence of a score of nieces and nephews, the guiding spirit of a whole house old. For she has been directed from her natural bent. She is, as it were, a blank sheet on which no words of comfort have ever been written, and on which no man will ever write them, and between which and the waste basket there is a mournfull obvious connection. The woman who is born to be a wife and a mother, and who fails to be either, can hardly be said to have fulfilled her destiny, even though she should take all the outcasts of humanity to her bosom; and although her ways may have fallen in pleasant places, and her days have gone on without trouble or annoy, though the stream of her existence has flowed as placidly and clearly as such “streams may flow, it is none the less certain that she would have enjoyed the world far more had one taken her by the hand for the long journey that ends in the churchyard, even though her road had lain altogether away from the green fields and quiet woods she traversed, and been set thick with thorns and stones and shards, and rough and bitter to an intolerable degree. For if she have avoided great sorrows, she has missed great joys; and it is certain that neither are sorrows shared so keen as those unshared, nor are such joys as we savor selfishly and without a companion to participate in them as large and wholesome as those that arise

therefore,

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from our intimacy with another. Life, in fact, is not a solo, but a duet; the song is too much for a single voice, and if a single voice essay it we are conscious that we are listening to something abnormal and that should not be. Sometimes the eflfect produced is comic, and we laugh and go our way. Sometimes, again, it is harsh and disagreeable, spiteful and shrill, bitter and unendurable, and we stop our ears and shut our windows. Often it is pathetic and beautiful, and we are rapt away in listening into an atmos%here of pity and admiration and regret. ut it is never perfect.—

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WORTH ON DRESSING.

An English paper gives the followin interesting particulars of Worth, the celebrated dress-maker:

Worth is a tallish man, with a big, clever head and very prominent forehead. His brown eyes are singularly shrewd in expression, and their seizure of detail is surprising—that is, for a man. As a rule, men have no more eye for detail than owls have for the sun. Worth takes you in at a glance, and knows what your style ought to be, which is such a comfort. When I go to a dress-maker, I don’t care to “work my pasage,” as Bob would say. I want to order a harmony in one or two colors, and to encounter brains equal to the occasion. Worth’s taste, when allowed full play, is irreproachable. “I prefer simplicity to everything else,” he says, “but there are women who don’t believe in the value of a dress unless it is loaded with trimming. They drive me mad, for they won’t take advice. Now, what is becoming to one person is hideous when worn by another.

study to make the best out of the subject given me, as, unfortunately, we can’t have people made to order, can we? If I had my way, all women should be slight, graceful and pretty. Then dressing would be an artistic pleasure. A dress should never overpower the wearer. It should merely be an appropriate frame for a charming picture, bringing out the beauties of the picture, but never detracting from it. So few women understand this. Why, when I find I can make a costume for less money than has been agreed upon, I actually annoy my clients by telling them so. They think it cannot be as handsome as it ought to be, and they would rather have more material added, however much the design may be marred, than pay less. I assure you this is a fact. Consequently, when I meet ladies who know that dressing is an art, I take very great satisfaction in having them as patrons. It isn’t every woman who knows how to wear a dress. When I have done my best, I try to have my client do her best by seeing her walk and sit down. To walk with style is rare enough, but when it comes to being able to sit

[graphic]
down in a dress properly—we1l, there are not many equal to that, I can tell you. Then, women think they ought to have a number of dresses, however hideous, rather than wear one dress, however becoming. There never was a greater mistake. f

our frame is appropriate, stick to it.

on’t be getting out of it and trying experiments. I have just made a dre for Mme. Nilsson, in which she looks better than I ever saw her before; and I have begrged her to wear that dress constantly in ussia if she wants to produce a most charming effect. As she is sensible, I think she will take my advice, which, you perceive, is against my interest; but, good gracious me, money is not my only object. Art is intended to beautify nature, not to

8 deform it.”

The Churchman, Volume 87

The Churchman, Volume 87

June 13, 1903 (39) 817 The Ohurchman.

5 3′ »s as

‘>225?

Summer Clerical Clothing.

WE ARE ALWAYS GLAD to answer any correspond ence regarding correct styles, materials or prices in the matter of clothing for clergymen.

Our Catalogue and Price List of Clerical Clothing and Vestments. together with samples of goods and directions for meas urements, sent upon request.

PRIEST CLOTH SUITINGS.

Imported tropical weight goods, strong and durable, especially adapted for clerical mid-summer wear. To order . . . . . . . . . . . . .. I25 00

SERGE SACK SUITS. Ready Made.

Ordinary sack coat, roll collar, round corners,

skeleton back or lined throughout, with

clerical or layman’s vest. and l.roI1ser’s…. 815.00 to 820.00

Cassock vest, 81.00 additional.

GLORIA SILK OASSOGKS.

Anglican or Latin, skeleton (no lining what ever), a. perfect summer vestment, cool and comfortable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 818.00

A discount of 10¢ to clergymen.

Browning Kll\2-§- Q

COOPER Sowms W., New Year: (Nearly opposite Cooper Union)

unopened. There were several advertise ments, two or three cards to teas, and a letter with an European postmark of Florence, Italy. It was from a dear old friend. Teresa Matthews, who had at tained some reputation abroad as an artist and occupied quite a prominent po sition in the winter society of Florence.

“Do you remember,” Miss Matthews wrote, “when you were last here, how we planned the next summer to make a tour together of the cathedral towns of France, and how I fell ill and the trip had to be abandoned? I am really in most robust health this spring and most anxious to undertake it. I am sure you have noth “18 special to keep you in America this summer, so why not take a steamer early in July for Havre and I will meet you there and we can travel together until November, when I must be back in Flor ence.” She then went on in a pleasant journalistic fashion to tell of the doings of numerous mutual friends.

Lavinia remained for a long time in lhmlght after she had finished reading it. It all sounded very delightful, and she was very fond of Teresa. She went to her desk, where a few weeks before she had written out all her plans for Sweet briar Farm, took out a sheet of foolscap Dflller, drew a black line down the mid dle and put on one side of the line “pros” and on the other side “cons” as to why she should continue and why she should not continue her summer work. She went over carefully all her conversations with Mrs. Crutwell and Miss Arnold, consult 1118 her note-book, and finally made out a Paper for her own satisfaction, similar to the following:

Complexion Bad, Liver Torpid, Appetite Poor ?

Horsford’s Acid Phosphate clears the °°1I1Dlexion by restoring stomach, liver and bowels to health. A strengthening

Tonic for mental, nervous or physical Weakness.

r ACLu5Iv: eottnzns or

Eleclric and Tubular Pneumniic Organs

Alsrttt llutvrttsiflitttcnrsr Svsrm

D ->.. .. us 1-.,.-..<… “<‘-pt-~e Boost \.Jl” an own on flPPlu:anQr\

Notes for old maids contemplating opening temporary] vacation homes for mothers and infants.

‘I. Mother’s milk, the milk of loving kindness. Country cows of good stock are 110i S0011 enough; You must have Walker Gordon Milk, chiefly obtainable in large cities, and you must overcome the dim culty, if you live in the hill country, of its arriving at its destination in the shape of cheese.

II. You must boil all the baby’s play things once a day for fear of germs, and before it goes out to play in the yard or to ride on the trolley car.

III. Cradles are absolutely unhygienic.

IV. You must always bathe a baby with most awful attention to the ther mometer, as one degree more or less might prove fatal. ‘

V. You must never bug or kiss it at any time, for fear of microbes or the in juring of its character.

VI. The ancient myths of Santa Claus and all fairy tales are most injurious to mental development. Stories of pure fact should be substituted, such as “How little Tommy made money, and skinned a. cent to make it two.”

VII. Most important of all, mother in stinct is very pernicious and at times dangerous, as we should always be gov erned by science.

Deduction: If mother instinct is dan gerous, old maid instinct must have the effect of dynamite.

There is more logic than hitherto sup posed in the association of the maiden lady with poodles, parrots, canary birds and cats. Advice gratis to maiden ladies in general: “Stick to poodles.”

She wears what they hate

There’s this Englishwoman who dedicates a website to the outfits she likes wearing but what her boyfriend despises. I have a feeling that if/when Stephanie Brown of DC Comics does go Goth for good, it would more or less leave the same effect on others. When I mean by that, it would be surprising for her to go Goth forever.

Not to mention that some people, regardless of their gender, can be controlling over what others wear. It’s like if you want to wear florals but somebody else wants you to wear something else. There are cases where it’s reasonable like you have to dress modestly in church. Other times it’s really controlling.

Especially if they might be abusive or at least upset (much moreso if they repress it for so long and often that they inevitably have to take it out on somebody else). It’s like if Stephanie were a real person and if she went Goth for good, sometimes if people can’t force her to dress more like what they want her to then they should just let her be.

Let her dress in black punk clothing if because sometimes they have no power over her and she wants to be left alone. Same with that woman too.

Low Tech Efficiency

If I’m not mistaken, the Dune stories are deliberately low tech in that the humans have fought against the increasingly sapient machines and decided to do away with most of them (assuming if some human communities still relied on high technology) and pretty much replaced them with superhumans. Some of them are even preternaturally good at mathematics (let’s not also forget that the author’s grandmother was really good at it despite not being schooled herself).

I even think that’s already the case in real life that there’ll always be people proficient in something so low tech. It’s like using multiple needles and alternating between them when getting a piece of clothing done quickly that’s if you focus hard enough and forgo sewing machines. That was likely the case before in the past where it wasn’t possible to do the things people now take for granted. Especially sometimes when it comes to ingenious people making the most out of it.

Putting much more thought

I suspect in actually giving characters individual faces (and personalities), that would be putting much more effort and thought than previously done. But one with implications that suggest what the character would end up like, even if you put your personal preferences into it and the like (some authors might also realise this). It’s like when it comes to putting a lot more effort into differentiating Cassie Sandsmark from Stephanie Brown.

Differences between them do exist but if/when most cartoonists don’t bother differentiating either their faces or their fashion sense when off-duty it’s going to be a challenge especially if/when comic books and the like are visual media, you need to put more effort into characterisation (I think others might realise it too). It’s like what would happen if Cassie likes florals and the colour red but Steph likes goth-punk styles and the colours black and purple.

If viewed from a fashion psychology standpoint, their character designs (especially when off-duty and also on-duty) are telling. Steph’s objectively that character who wears a mask and is also shown to be really angry at her own father as well as apparently disobeying Batman. Cassie’s arguably not any better but the fact that she never wore a mask and was initially shown to be an enthusiastic Wonder Woman fan’s telling.

This should have profound implications for character design and the like because it says more about the characters than what’s initially intended or shown early on. If Cassie never bothers putting on a mask when as Wonder Girl, openly emulating Wonder Woman and tends to wear floral prints and bright red when off-duty should indicate an extroverted personality.

Likewise if Steph tends to be masked when in combat and seen in Gothic-punk clothing when off-duty, in addition to wanting to seek others for approval but loses her temper easily and is even sharp-tongued should indicate that she wouldn’t just score high on neuroticism (again not always the case but useful for understanding Goth sensibilities) but also low on agreeableness and conscientiousness especially if she’s shown to be stubborn and impulsive.

Again not always the case but telling in that there needs more effort in differentiating the two, especially when off-duty that necessitates having to delve more into their personalities and trying to extrapolate their preferences and sensibilities from those in addition to some amount of personal preference.

How to differentiate the two DC girls

I suspect if there’s ever a practical way to differentiate otherwise similar looking characters when out of costume, it’s going to be a challenge if one’s used to a template though others do bother to change and deviate. (I swear they may bother to learn more.) Let’s take Cassandra Sandsmark and Stephanie Brown. They are two different characters with the former being quite obviously a nerdy fangirl especially early on.

(Which I find it ironic as Cassie should have an advantage over Donna Troy, being much more accessible by being a Wonder Woman fanatic.)

They might be some attempts to differentiate the two but that would be putting a lot more thought on their personalities, far more than what canonical/official media provide. It’s like what would happen if Cassie likes dressing in florals, pastels and bright reds (that’s even there in canon) but Stephanie tends to err closer to goth-punk clothing and purple (also canon).

Especially when out of costume, this is enough to give an idea of what their actual fashion sensibilities are like. Cassie Sandsmark’s never a masked character and needn’t one at all. Stephanie’s no stranger to wearing masks, one might wonder if she prefers to be guarded from people she doesn’t trust (if she’s stated to have a temper and be mean to criminals, one wonders if she wants to intimidate people).

There’s even something like fashion psychology which analyses and understands how and why people dress the way they do. Especially with regards to the big five personality traits of extraversion/introversion, calmness/neuroticism, agreeableness/disagreeableness and conscientiousness/stubbornness. Keep in mind that this may not always be the case for others.

Whilst tendency to correlate dark clothing with neuroticism only makes sense among Goth circles, among some sports teams and religious communities this should indicate conscientiousness and agreeableness. Ad infinitum, ad nauseum. If applied to Cassie and Steph or even other women, this should enable character designers to delve more into their personalities even if they want to put in their ideas of them.

Like I said, Cassie Sandsmark’s never a masked character to begin with. So she should be easily seen wearing florals, pastels and bright reds whenever out of costume. Steph on the other hand is no stranger to wearing a mask and in her earliest outing as Spoiler, her hair’s invisible. If she’s also shown to be sarcastic and grouchy, even to her own dad, she should also score lower on agreeableness.

The fact that if she’s said to do things against what others like Batman expects her to, then it shouldn’t be a stretch for her to score lower on conscientiousness and agreeableness, albeit somewhat more than Cassie does. This does turn character design on its head, if because it necessitates people to get into the characters themselves.

Especially in what they want to and will to wear.

You don’t mess with me

The sukeban subculture was initially and basically not just about delinquent girls but also delinquent girls who didn’t want to be taken advantage of and sexualised (even if they eventually did in some Japanese films). If long skirts are sometimes considered frumpy or too prissy, might the sukeban deliberately take advantage of this to avoid being sexually harrassed. Some delinquent girls who bleach their hair and wear jackets might be doing something similar.

If I’m not mistaken there was a Tofugu article stating that to some Japanese women, undyed (natural black) hair’s enough to make somebody a target of sexual harrassment. Same with women who dress in jeans and shirts. Another said that women who do bleach their hair either do it out of fashion, compliance with a company and in some cases to deflect unwanted male attention. Especially if/when it acts as a kind of sartorial aposematism.

(There’s another survey stating that bleached blond hair’s not that well-favoured in Japan.)

Whilst not always the case either, I won’t be so surprised if there are any women who dress to deliberately deter unwanted male attention whatever they can do about it.